Charlotte Perkins Gilman Papers

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Collection Overview
Title: Charlotte Perkins Gilman papers
Creator: Gilman, Charlotte Perkins, 1860-1935
Call Number: D.513
Dates: 1878-1890
Physical Description: .19 Cubic feet
Language(s): Materials are in English
Repository: Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation

Biographical/Historical Note
Charlotte Anna Perkins was born July 3, 1860 in Hartford, Connecticut, the daughter of Frederick Beecher Perkins (1828-1899) and Mary Anna Fitch Westcott (ca. 1830-1892). She had one sibling, Thomas Adie (1858-1938). After Frederick Perkins abandoned the family in 1867, they moved frequently before settling in Providence, Rhode Island in 1873. Following an irregular formal education, Gilman developed her artistic skills in course work at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1878–79, after which she found sporadic employment as an art teacher and illustrator. Gilman designed advertising trade cards into the mid-1880s, most notably for the soap manufacturer Kendall Manufacturing Company. After a stormy courtship, Gilman married artist Charles Walter Stetson on May 2, 1884. The pair had one daughter, Katherine (1885-1979), before separating in 1888. Charlotte moved to California, where she soon developed a national reputation as an author and speaker, addressing topics including race, evolution, gender roles and women's rights. She and Stetson divorced in 1894. Her second marriage, in 1900, to her cousin George Houghton Gilman, lasted until his death in 1934. Gilman committed suicide in California on August 17, 1935.

Access
The Charlotte Perkins Gilman papers is open for research use. Researchers are advised to contact Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation prior to visiting. Upon arrival, researchers will also be asked to fill out a registration form and provide photo identification.Use
Reproductions are made upon request but can be subject to restrictions. Permission to publish materials from the collection must currently be requested. Please note that some materials may be copyrighted or restricted. It is the researcher's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other case restrictions when publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the collections. For more information contact rarebks@library.rochester.eduScope and Content
The bulk of the collection is Gilman's correspondence to her friend Martha Luther Lane during the period of 1882 to 1889. The letters address her work, marriage, motherhood and depression. This and other correspondence forms the first series. The second series contains some of Gilman's advertising trade cards.

Subject(s):
Marriage
Motherhood
Mental health
Correspondence
Advertising cards
Gilman, Charlotte Perkins, 1860-1935
Lane, Martha Luther, 1862-1948
Authors, American
Social reformers
Immediate Source of Acquisition
This collection of Gilman's correspondence was purchased in 2017 with the support of the Friends of the University of Rochester Libraries. Advertising trade cards designed by Gilman have been acquired separately by gift and purchases.Citation
[Item title, item date], Charlotte Perkins Gilman papers, D.513, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of RochesterProcessing Information
The abbreviation A.L.S. means autographed letter signed. Some of Gilman's letters were written over several days and may be so dated on the first page (March 27-28) or contain various dates in the body of the letter. Both of these instances are represented by an inclusive date range at the item level.
Administrative Information
Author:
Publisher: Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation
Address:
Rush Rhees Library
Second Floor, Room 225
Rochester, NY 14627-0055
rarebks@library.rochester.edu
URL: http://www.library.rochester.edu/rbscp


Content List
Series I: Correspondence and documents
Correspondence from Charlotte Perkins Gilman to Martha Allen Luther Lane
While growing up in Providence, Gilman became friends with Martha Allen Luther (October 6, 1862-1948), the only surviving child of banker John Luther (1826-1876) and Emily Shaw (1832-1918). Following her marriage to Charles A. Lane (1851-1884) in 1882, Martha lived in Hingham, Massachusetts. The Lanes had two children: Charles Chester (1883-1967) and Margaret (1886-1972).

Box 1, Folder 11882
Invitation to the wedding of Martha A. Luther to Charles A. Lane, October 5, 1882
1 pages
Printed invitation on one leaf, single vertical and horizontal folds. No manuscript notations or envelope.

October 11, 1882
From Providence, Rhode Island. 9 p.m. Gilman jests with Lane about her newly married state (Martha Luther married Charles A. Lane on October 5, 1882), and describes her own relations with Charles Walter Stetson and his family.
8 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. Corrections by Gilman include renumbering of pages 6-8.

December 11, 1882
From Providence, Rhode Island. Includes on pages 5-6, "...Work presses, of course. It grows rather tiresome too. You see I have got to where I have ideas, and think of lots of pretty things that I might be making now instead of this ceaseless copying of little studies. Last year it was well enough, but now I want to originate. I'm getting real handy with oils too ."
8 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two folded leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds.

Box 1, Folder 21883
January 3, 1883
From Providence, Rhode Island. Composed partly in rhyme. Illustration of woman with umbrella on page 5. Gilman writes of her relationship with Walter Stetson and of her work, including, on page 4, a reference to receiving $5 from Tiffany for dinner cards. AO and, on page 7, "...I feel happy. Not only on account of my love for my lover and my lover's love for me, but because I begin to see the first fruits of a slender little reputation which will grow steadily and be worth more every year..."
8 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. Faint 1 x 2 inch stain on page 4.

April 9, 1883
From Providence, Rhode Island. 6:30-35 p.m. Gilman reflects on work: "I couldn't do the Harper thing, dear. I can't draw yet" (page 3) and on mutual friends (including their engagements), and on her own marriage plans: "...You ask when I am going to be married. Not for a year at least. I am going away. Going to work as some sort of teacher or companion as far off as possible for the coming fall and winter. Beyond that my plans will depend on circumstances..."
8 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves,each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. Imperfection in sheet formation of second leaf,including 2mm hole located 1 cm below "if" on line 1, page 8.

May 20, 1883
From Providence, Rhode Island. "... Dear, I am coming to Boston Monday June 4th...mean to stay...for a week... I want to call on Dr. Keller ..." Possibly a reference to Dr. Elizabeth C. Keller.
3 pages
A.L.S. in ink on single leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds. Scattered foxing, mainly near lower horizontal fold.

August 16, 1883
From 207 Angell St., Providence, Rhode Island. 9:20-25 p.m. Features two illustrations of Lane's baby Charles: the first shows him "plump in the extreme" with a mace in hand; the other on a pedestal with an endless line of worshipers lying prostrate before him.
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds. Scattered foxing along center fold.

August 17, 1883
From 207 Angell St., Providence, Rhode Island. "7:30 or near it." Gilman describes a tea party at which she and friends played a game variously known as The Ten Birds or A Good Fat Hen which begins "A good fat hen. Two ducks and a good fat hen. Three screaming wild geese, two ducks, and a good fat hen..." Gilman includes her own alliterative verse for the game. Page 4 features an illustration of a female angel.
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on single leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds. Scattered foxing along vertical media fold, especially lower half inch.

October 27-28, 1883
From Providence, Rhode Island. "8.5 p.m." Gilman acknowledges Lane's satisfaction as a wife and mother before relaying that she has an "…ever growing sense of the wrong and wild unhappiness in the world about [her] ..." Gilman cites instances of social and economic disparity. She states that she earns $3 for teaching a gymnastics class to 6 girls three times a week at "Mrs. Drinan's." In closing, Gilman writes, "Would you not leave everything else in the world for your husband? Yes, I am happy."
11 pages
A.L.S. in ink on three leaves, each with single vertical fold and two horizontal folds.

November 3, 8, 1883
From Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman continues to reflect on the issues raised in her letter of October 27-28, and Lane's response. "You widely misunderstand me if you think by misery I mean poverty. Poverty is both an effect and a cause of evil, and it is poverty that makes and keeps many men worse than beasts ... But horrible as Poverty is, it is not that that wrings my heart. It is the – O for words strong enough to say what I mean! – the hideous folly, the selfishness that lives only for its own delight...Emerson is right in what he says ..." (pages 3-4) "I'm not a pessimist Martha, I believe in God and Evolution; but I believe in Preventabile [sic] Misery too." (page 6) Gilman writes, too, of her French lessons as well as her work and recent earnings.
10 pages
A.L.S. in ink on three leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds.

December 11, 14, 1883
From Providence, Rhode Island. "December 11, 9:30 p.m." Small (1 cm.) illustration of a woman, page 1. "December 14, 10:20 or so p.m." Gilman plans to visit Lane on December 26, staying on a day or two as she must return for a Sunday School festival. She will "…drop the social reform question (or rather the social horror question, for I broached no theories of reformation,) for the present ..." but she intends to "write more bye and bye. A kind of Learned Female Argument by correspondence ..." (page 4)On page 6, Gilman reports that an 1881 poem beginning "In duty, bound. A life hemmed in whichever way the spirit turns to look…" has been accepted for publication by "The Woman's Journal." "... It's a good paper, organ of a cause I believe in; and appropriate setting to the verses. No pay, but that's no matter; I'm glad to begin to find a voice...I do not hope ever to make much by writing, for I shan't write "saleable articles.". I mean to write only hot truths bravely spoken; to write for the sake of saying something worth while, not for the pay. And some time far away maybe I shall be heard…"
Mentions of good friends Retta Clark and Carrie Hazard close the letter along with acknowledgment that [Charles] Walter Stetson continues to love her despite her "changefulness."
8 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds.

Box 1, Folder 31884
January 24, 1884
From Providence, Rhode Island. "9:10 p.m. Thurs." Gilman reports that she and Walter Stetson plan to marry in May and that her "various pomes [sic]" have been printed in the January 12 issue of Woman's Journal.
4 pages
emph: Our Mutual Friend

February 11, 1884
From Providence, Rhode Island. "9:15 nearly p.m." Notes mother and aunt playing cards. Announces that her wedding is to be May 2 (page 4) and includes a drawing of the location of the "upper tenement of a house" where they hope to live. Two small drawings, of the attic and as a suggestion for an affordable wedding gift, "a Japanese matchbox," appear on page 5. Pages 6-8 include details of her pupils, including Blanche Westcott.
8 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds.

March 21-22, 1884
From Providence, Rhode Island. Written in several installments over 2 days. Gilman reports that her new home is being readied before her marriage. A small illustration of a newly purchased butter pot is on page 3. The couple are buying china, with modest funds generated from Walter Stetson's recent exhibition. Lane has been writing and Gilman, on page 7, says "I've had three poems in print!!!"
7 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds.

April 11, 1884
"After 10 p.m." Lane was unable to visit. More details about wedding preparations..
3 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, three horizontal folds. Some creasing at lower right corner of page 1.

May 5, 1884
From "Home.emph>" First letter with the signature "Charlotte Anna Perkins Stetson." Gilman gives a detailed description of her new home, its furnishings and decorations (a small drawing of a chest is on page 3)and of her happiness. She details her wedding dress, shown in a drawing on page 5, and the wedding party. Page 7 features a drawing of Mary and Ray Phelan who "stuck their heads out of the bay window and congratulated us warmly as we passed." She reports her pleasure at being addressed as 'Mrs. Stetson.' The last line indicates that she had enclosed a poem from a new book: that poem is not a part of the collection and its title is unknown.
8 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds. Evidence of paperclip, top left. Small circular brown stain: page 1, 5 lines from bottom, on "imagine" and line 4, page 8, on "It's." Ink smudges: line 3 from bottom, page 1; line 6 page 5; lines 5-7, 9, 11 on page 8.

June 8, 1884
From Wayland Street, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman describes the interior and exterior of her home and how she and her husband often spend their time. One pastime is making "combination pictures." Although Gilman notes that one of these pictures is enclosed, it is not present here. Children in the apartment below have scarletina.
7 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. Small chips and 3mm loss at lower horizontal fold page 6.

July 21-22, 1884
On July 21, Gilman writes from "within an hour of Red Bridge" and on July 22 from Wayland. She reports that she has subscribed to the Century,Nation, and Harper's Weekly with "her own money" and that her uncle, Unitarian minister Edward Everett Hale, had recently visited.
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds. Crescent shaped tear, 5/8 inch,center bottom of page 4 with no loss.

August 7, 1884
From Wayland Street, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman hopes to plan a visit to see Lane, and Dr. Keller--possibly a reference to Dr. Elizabeth C. Keller. She describes early morning walks and recent visitors.
3 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds. Scattered staining on blank page.

August 12, 1884
From Wayland Street, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman writes of her upcoming visit to Lane; her husband will not accompany her as he is working on a painting for the Mechanics Fair.
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds. On page 4: crescent shaped brown stain, 2.8 cm, at lower fold and 4 mm brown spot at edge.

November 20, 1884
From Wayland Street, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman writes of Harry Manchester's health and of how her own pregnancy is affecting her health. Page 3 features a small drawing of an collar, page 4 a drawing of "Alpha" long underwear. Pages 6-8 are largely concerned with her study of free trade and political economy.
11 pages
A.L.S. in ink on three leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. Evidence of metal paperclip on page 1 and blank page [12].

Box 1, Folder 41885
January 13-14, 1885
From Wayland Street, Providence, Rhode Island. Page 1 dated January 13, page 13 continues on January 14.. Gilman is preparing for the birth of her child. She also writes of her work, the 1884 election "...the world spectacle of a nation like this – Men – Christian, Civilized, Intelligent Men by the million; being reduced to the helpless and pitiful alternative of 'a choice between two evils' as an instance of popular government..." Gilman suggests works Lane might use in an upcoming English poetry course for young people including several by Robert Browning and agrees to loan books by Lewis Carroll and others.
15 pages
A.L.S. in ink on four leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. The first leaf is on a different paper than the other three.

March 19, 1885
From Wayland Street, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman jests about the impending birth of her child (her child was born on March 23) but also relates her "eager expectation."
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds. Evidence of metal paper clip, especially on pages 1 and 4.

Charles Walter Stetson to Lane, March 23, 1885
Gilman's husband announces the birth of his daughter. "My first letter shall be to you, her dearest friend, to tell you that Charlotte has passed safely through her trial. A girl was born this morning at five minutes of nine, - as healthy and every-way-well conditioned a little piece of humanity as one could possibly see..."
3 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, three horizontal folds. Ink blurred in several spots on pages 2 and 3.

April 26-29,1885
From Wayland Street, Providence, Rhode Island. Written about a month after Gilman's daughter Katherine, was born. "... Walter and I have found the baby – well, engrossing...Seems to me there ought to be a "course" for all girls meaning to marry, whereby they might gain some knowledge of how to treat wee infants. At this late date (28th) I begin to feel that there are some things I don't know ... " Details of the child follow.
7 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. Evidence of metal paper clip, especially on pages 1 and [8]; faint inch by1 x half inch brown stain on page 1 between "paltry" and "meant."

July 8, 15, 1885
From Wayland Street, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman writes of her depression. "...I feel as though I were drifting open eyed into insanity...What seems most suspicious to me is that I no longer care much about whether I live or die, do much or little, cause pain or pleasure..." She reports that Dr. Keller had advised going out, including to the gymnasium. When the letter moves to July 15, Gilman laments that her memory is not what is was and that she has been reading a lot of novels and stories, including those by Charles Victor Cherbuliez.
8 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds.

August 11, 18, 1885
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman responds in detail to Lane's attempts to help her overcome her depression. On July 18, she reports that due to her worsening condition, Dr. Knight, a homeopath, had been summoned and put in charge of her care and a serving maid been hired. The letter closes with an illustration of a boxer.
6 pages
A.L.S. in ink on three lined leaves, each with three horizontal folds. Paper is acidic and fragile. First leaf has chips and small losses at top.

August 22, 1885
Gilman addresses her depression and the importance of being able to work, that is, to write. "...I believe myself able to write things worthy the world should hear. Time will show whether that be true or not...I am glad marriage is to you all you tell me...But it is not to me. I am glad you love me. I am glad my husband loves me. But no amount of love can keep me happy while I am hindered from my work." Page 4: "When Dr. Knight spoke...about my present duties ... I admitted all that he said and simply asked him if he would like to give up his business, his education, his ambition, etc. and do the same thing? Being an honest man he laughed and said no. Being a reasonable being (!) he did not say that as I was a woman the case was different ..." Gilman closes by saying that she believes she will get better, but that it will be a slow process.
6 pages
A.L.S. in ink on three lined leaves, each with two horizontal folds.

August 28, 1885
From 26 Humboldt Aveune, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman recounts at length the misgivings she had about marriage and the guilt she feels for having gone forward and causing both parties pain. The homeopath Dr. Knight is visiting once or twice a week. [page 11] "I'm getting better. I dare say if I get really well I may live some time." On page 12, she compares herself to a sapling being held down, "It didn't get any stronger by persevering pressure. It is down now, fastened down. Either it snaps back tearing everything that held it, learns to grow as it is, or – dies." An illustration of a sapling fastened down follows. The letter closes with a nonsense rhyme Gilman wrote for Eddie Jackson, a boy she cared for as a governess in 1883: "There was a young man in high boots / Who gave all his attention to fruits. / He tried to raise pears / In triangles and squares, / And make apple trees grow / without roots."
13 pages
A.L.S. in ink on four leaves, the first three with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds, the last with two horizontal folds only.

August 30, 1885
While Gilman agrees with the doctor that she is improving, she writes: "I feel that soon I shall lose this keen sense of what I have lost and what I must bear, and settle for very life's sake into the same half-life most people live..." The letter further catalogs her difficulty in being a writer, a wife, and a mother. At its close, Gilman refers to enclosures which are not present here.
10 pages
A.L.S. in ink on three leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. Evidence of metal paper clip, especially on pages 1 and 10.

September 5, 1885
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. "...Be assured that as health and strength return I shall endure and work as of old. Be assured that when next power and control fade from me and I suffer again as I so foolishly tried to show you, that you will not hear of it ..."
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, three horizontal folds.

September 12, 1885
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman writes of her relationships with her mother and husband during her illness. "...my work will be hindered by an unhappy home life instead of helped by a happy one. Right or wrong, normal or abnormal, my work is not at home."
8 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. Scattered foxing.

October 8, 1885
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman is weaning her child and planning "in desperation, or rather in emotionless discouragement" to go west, to visit Thomas, presumably her brother. On page 6, a drawing illustrates how she feels torn between two people (her mother and husband), who do not get along.
9 pages
A.L.S. in ink on four leaves, the first with a single vertical fold and three horizontal folds, the rest with three horizontal folds.

Box 1, Folder 51886
April 17, 22, 1886
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman expresses appreciation of Lane's friendship. She and her daughter Katherine are ill with bronchitis. Page 4: "I've lost my idea of my own importance. I no longer feel it as any loss to the world."
8 pages
A.L.S. in ink on four leaves, each with two horizontal folds. Evidence of metal paper clip on pages 1 and 8. Blurred ink stains on pages 3, 7.

April 30, 1886
From 24 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman writes that she is enclosing "the Alpha circular"--it is not present here. She reports that her mother has left the household to return to housekeeping on Manning Street and "being a sort of second nurse." Gilman's daughter Katherine has cut two upper teeth.
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one pink leaf. Single vertical fold, four horizontal folds.

May 4, 7,1886
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman writes of her continuing depression: "I've past the agony stage by months, past the wild weeping and the immediate danger of insanity; it's just a flat dry waste of hopeless melancholy now..." [page 5] and of her husband's love.
14 pages
A.L.S. in ink on seven leaves, each with two horizontal folds. Evidence of metal paper clip on pages 1 and 14; one inch tear on page 5 near edge along with scattered foxing.

September 26, 1886
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman's daughter Katherine is flourishing and her own health improving. She went to Boston to see Dr. Keller for a diagnosis: "She [Keller] said the trouble was not mental, but nervous...she gave me no advice... Then my dear Walter said that I should go and live my life, that it was right...but first I must take courage and work and help get some money to make the change...I braced up, and set to work. Wrote a ghost story and divers poems. Did some note paper..." Her husband also brought home the medicine 'Essence of Oats' which she has found helpful. Page 10: "I have had one poem accepted by the Prov. Journal, price three dollars...have had one poem almost accepted by the Atlantic...and have had one poem accepted by the Woman's Journal." She also reports on paid work painting or inking note paper and dinner cards along with tutoring a pupil. Page 12: "...I am keeping my journal again... in a kind of dreary imitation, I am myself again."
12 pages
A.L.S. in ink on three leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. Evidence of metal paper clip on pages 1 and 12.

October 28, 1886
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman comments on the birth of Lane's daughter Margaret and on her own work painting dinner cards and textiles. She has had a poem published in Woman's Journal and reprinted by the Boston Sunday Herald. "Truly this is fame!" On page 3: "Mr. Gillette [William Hooker Gillette] was here to tea last night; and afterward I read him the play..." Gilman also reports on the October 3 death of "Julia."
5 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. Evidence of metal paper clip on pages 1 and [6].

December 16, 1886
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. After details of a possible visit, Gilman discusses her poem "The Answer" which had been published in Woman's Journal on October 2, 1886.
6 pages
A.L.S. in ink on two leaves, each with a single vertical fold and two horizontal folds. Page two has been mutilated: a 1.5 x 4.25 inch portion, lower right, below signature, has been excised.

Box 1, Folder 61887
March 10, 1887
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman and her daughter have both been ill, as has Lane and her daughter.
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds.

November 25, 1887
From Providence, Rhode Island. Addressed to "Pleasing Young Person," presumed to be Lane. Gilman will be visiting Boston on November 29. Signed, "Charlotte A. Perkins."
2 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds.

December 18, 1887
From Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman writes of upcoming visit to Lane in Boston, and illustrates on page 2 the trunk she will bring.
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds.

Box 1, Folder 71888
April 17, 1888
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island.
3 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds.

August 3, 1888
From Bristol, Rhode Island. Gilman complements Lane on her family and writes of her upcoming plans to return to California with Grace Ellery Channing (1862-1937). "...Walter is reconciled to the plan...As long as I stay with him he will never leave me...This summer has proved for the fourth time that I get well when away from him ..." Page 4: "...Grace and I have written over our play and are to have a hearing from Gillette the last of August..."
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds.

August 27, 1888
From Bristol, Rhode Island. The play Gilman and Grace Ellery Channing have been working on has been conditionally accepted by William Hooker Gillette. She writes of her plans to go to Pasadena, where her husband would visit in the winter to paint for a few months before leaving for Europe.
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds.

September 21, 1888
From 26 Humboldt Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island. "Came home Aug. 31st. Close the house tomorrow...Have begun a hack book "Gems of Art for the Home & Fireside" at request of J. A. & R. A. Reid, printer – to be done a week from today – 150 pages of com. note. No great work, but takes time. Only 18 pages done ..." She is planning to leave for California on October 8.
3 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Three vertical folds, one horizontal fold. Brown staining to edge.

Box 1, Folder 81889
September 7, 1889
From Box 1877, Pasadena, California. Gilman encourages Lane to move to California, suggests that Mr. Lane could connect with fruiurit packing establishment. She writes of her various family members, publication of her "Girls of Today" in the July 6 Woman's Journal and her new position as co-editor of The Pacific Monthly.
8 pages
A.L.S. in ink on four lined leaves, each with two horizontal folds.

Box 1, Folder 9Undated
Based on content, context, and provenance, it is assumed that Martha Lane Luther lane was the receipient of these letters.

circa 1887
Illustration on page 1: woman reading on a cliff above the sea with a man reclining behind her. Illustration on page 4: woman being transported aloft by two identical men. The letter seems to comment on baseball, referring to 18 men trying to catch a ball.
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds.

"Dear Marfa! Your two..."
"Your two boxes with their lovely contents arrived yesterday... Am well, real well. Your own loving friend Charlotte. Merry Christmas! Walter sends regards love to baby."
3 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, three horizontal folds.

Poem
"I stop to add, dear Mrs. Lane / That we next week set off for Maine / And if you do not write again / Before that time it's very plain / That the production of your brain / Composed for me with toil and pain / Would not arrive, and I be fain / My head to twist and neck to crane/And ears to stretch and eyes to strain / To search for it, and search in vain / If I in sooth to search would deign / So write with all your might & main / The letter I desire to gain; / And write it without blot or stain / And loaded like a groaning wain / With literary fruit & grain / And loving words as thick as rain / Unless it be too great a drain / Upon your strength dear Mrs. Lane!"
1 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Two horizontal folds.

Illustrated incomplete letter, 'Girl of Majorca'
On page 3, a rhyme by Edward Lear, "There was a Young Girl of Majorca" accompanied by an illustration of a woman being led up a mountain by several men, one of whom is serving as a step. On page 4, an illustration of a veiled woman is surrounded by manuscript.
1 page
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, multiple horizontal folds. Numbered by Gilman, pages 3 and 4.

Illustrated incomplete letter beginning "are to be comparitively near us..."
Numbered by Gilman pages 5 and 6. Page 5 includes an illustration of a woman looking out of a window while another passes on the street below, presumably related to Gilman's writing "you can catch me as I go to Ada's..." On page 6, Gilman expresses surprise that Lane might move to a house she's not seen and illustrates it with a woman startled by mice and insects coming out of an open door.
1 page
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, multiple horizontal folds.

Illustrated incomplete letter beginning "It is the right spirit..."
Pages numbered 5 and 6 by Gilman. Page 5 is illustrated with a couple seated on chairs, apparently Martha and Chester Lane.
1 page
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, multiple horizontal folds.

Incomplete letter beginning "7:30 a.m. 19th", 1887-88?
"...Having recovered from my 'blues' I may state that I am well...The same may be said of Walter; both of our heavens being much clouded by lack of means ..." Page 12: "My novel is as yet untouched..." Signed "Charlotte A. Perkins."
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds. Apparently lacking pages 2-9.

Incomplete letter beginning "It is a cooperative dress-making..."
Apparently from California: "Also I mean to give some lectures in Los Angeles if it can be managed. By these various devices shall I keep the wolves from the door; and add mightily to my fame in these parts ... I am much interested in the Nationalist. She reports that she has been corresponding with her father. Signed Charlette Perkins Stetson.
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds. Numbered by Gilman pages 9-12 only.

Correspondence from Charlotte Perkins Gilman to A. Fanny Alden
Correspondence to persons other than Martha Luther Lane.

From Wayland Street, Providence, Rhode Island. Gilman read ancient history under Alden's direction for two years and the women became friends. Here Gilman discusses her pregnancy and her current reading on free trade and political economy.
4 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf. Single vertical fold, three horizontal folds.

General correspondence
Relationship of these documents to either Charlotte Perkins Gilman or to Martha Luther Lane is unclear.

Professor Eaton thanks Canfield for mineral specimens and asks for information concernning Anomalite.
1 pages
On Wellesley College letterhead.

3 pages
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf of embossed stationery. Single vertical fold, two horizontal folds. Some staining.

Relates details of a visit to the Chicago World's Fair. Possibly incomplete.
4 pages
A.L.S. in pencil on one leaf. Two vertical folds, one horizontal folds. Illustrated.

Documents
Notes on the building of a meeting house.
1 pages
Subject(s):
Notes (Documents)
A.L.S. in ink on one leaf.

Series II: Advertising trade cards designed by Gilman, 1878-1884
Cards for Kendall Manufacturing Co., Providence, Rhode Island
Purchase, 2017.
On back: "Kendall Mfg. Co. Soaps and Soapine… To protect yourself from the evil…"

Purchase, 2017.
Subject(s):
Advertising cards
On back: "French Laundry is the best soap ever made…"

Purchase, 2017.
On back: "Cleanliness in the house, laundry, kitchen and workshop is best secured…"

Purchase, 2017.
Subject(s):
Advertising cards
"Soapine the Great Dirt Killer, Will Remove Dirt of All Descriptions…"

2 cards
Gift of Victor Markiewicz, 1998.
Subject(s):
Advertising cards
On back: "For Washing and Cleaning Everything, No Matter What…"

Gift of Victor Markiewicz, 1998.
On back: "Soapine a perfect compound for washing…"

Gift of Victor Markiewicz, 1998.
Subject(s):
Advertising cards
On back: "Soapine is the best article known…"

Gift of Victor Markiewicz, 1998.
Subject(s):
Advertising cards
On back: "For Washing & Cleaning Everything, No Matter What…"

Cards for Curtis Davis and Co., Boston, Massachusetts
Purchase, 2017.
Printed by Donaldson Brothers, Five Points, New York. Back of card is blank.

"Three Ages of Woman" cards
As a series, these cards depict a female maturing from childhood to old age. Each figure is dressed distinctly, and each head surrounded by a different flower.
6 cards
Purchase, 2012.

Subject(s):
Advertising cards
Back of card printed: "J.K. Niles. Dealer in stoves and hardware...825 South Halsted Street, Chicago."

1 card
Subject(s):
Advertising cards
Printed on back of card: Westland Safety Lamp Co., announcement of a "branch holiday store" at 170 Westminster St. and a description of the goods for sale.

1 card
Subject(s):
Advertising cards
Back of card is blank.

2 cards
Source of the card stamped "Clinton Bros. and Co." is unknown
Subject(s):
Advertising cards
Printed on the image side of one card is: "Clinton Bros. and Co. manufacturers and publishers of chromo and beeveled edge cards, Clintonville, Conn." Printed on the back of the second card is: "Prof. Fair's Hair Care....Providence, R.I."

1 card
Subject(s):
Advertising cards
Back of card is blank.

Subject(s):
Advertising cards
Back of card stamped: "N. Bangs Williams & Co., booksellers...Providence, R.I."



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