Elizabeth Stanton Hardy Papers

In line with the University of Rochester’s recommendations regarding COVID-19, the Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation will be closed to the public until further notice, effective Monday, March 16, 2020.

Other Views:  Print/PDF  |  EAD Note: You may browse using the navigation on the left, or use Ctrl-F to search within this finding aid.

Elizabeth Stanton Hardy papers
Creator: Hardy, Elizabeth Stanton, 1876-1969
Call Number: D.199
Dates: 1923-1976
Physical Description: 4 boxes
Language(s): Materials are in English
Repository: Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester

Table of Contents:

Biographical/Historical Note
Scope and Content
Subject(s)
Immediate Source of Acquisition
Access
Use
Citation
Content List
Collection Overview
Title: Elizabeth Stanton Hardy papers
Creator: Hardy, Elizabeth Stanton, 1876-1969
Call Number: D.199
Dates: 1923-1976
Physical Description: 4 boxes
Language(s): Materials are in English
Repository: Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester

Biographical/Historical Note
Elizabeth Stanton Hardy was born on August 27, 1876, in Cleveland, Ohio. Her father, William Penn Stanton, was a native Rochesterian who had moved to Cleveland. Her mother, Elizabeth (Holm) Stanton, was the niece of John Blair, a pillar of Cleveland society and the co-builder of the Ohio Canal. As a young girl, Mrs. Hardy lived in her great-uncle's house and went to private schools in Cleveland. She later completed a correspondence course on lyric poetry from Columbia University. She knew many prominent people in Cleveland, including the future wife of Dwight Morrow.

On September 5, 1905, Elizabeth married William R. Hardy, another Rochesterian, and came to live in Rochester. Mr. Hardy owned the Motorway Tire Sales Company. The couple had two children, Stanton Montgomery (1906-1968) and Elizabeth Sara. Her son became a doctor and served in the Air Force during World War II. Her daughter married Gustave Husson. During this time Mrs. Hardy was active in a number of humanitarian causes. She was chairman of a Red Cross committee that gathered supplies to outfit a hospital in Vichy, France during World War I. She was also active in the Presbyterian church, becoming the president of the Genesee Presbytery from 1928 to 1933. She was a member of both the Poetry Society of America and the local Rochester Poetry Club, serving a term as president of the latter in 1937.

Several years after her husband's death in 1947, Mrs. Hardy moved to New York City. During her three-year stay she became a member of the Pen and Brush Club, whose membership included other poets such as Laura Benet. She met these poets through Harold Vinal, the editor of Voices, a poetry magazine that frequently published her poems. She lived the last years of her life with her daughter, Mrs. Gustave Husson, in Rochester. She died on August 16, 1969.

Besides working for social and religious concerns, Mrs. Hardy was absorbed in writing poetry. She began writing poetry at the age of nine and continued to write and revise her poems until her death at the age of ninety-two. Even before her marriage, she began to have her work published in journals and newspapers. Later, her poems were published in magazines such as The Lyric, Voices, and The American Scholar. She published her first book of poems, Time in the Turning, in 1940. She also wrote a handbook for writing poetry called Poetry, the Shaping of Words in 1956. It was the product of her own experience in teaching poetry in her home for thirteen years. The New School in New York City later adopted it as a textbook. She also wrote a series of autobiographical articles that was published in The Cleveland Plain Dealer in 1949. These articles were apparently later incorporated into a book, Leaves From This Stem, but it is unclear if this was ever published. Before she died, Mrs. Hardy was putting together another book of poems, evidently to be called Signature Upon Rock. This book went through various stages of composition as she added and deleted various poems.

Scope and Content
The typescripts of the poems associated with this projected book comprise about one-fourth of the collection, the other three-fourths being other typescripts, manuscript rough drafts, correspondence, clippings, and other memorabilia. Few of the poems exist in only a single copy; the often multiple copies with corrections demonstrate Mrs. Hardy's painstaking attention to her craft. The collection has been arranged so that the poems relating to Signature Upon Rock come first. Copies of other poems are alphabetized by title. Although all of the typescript versions of a particular poem have been placed together in Box 1,.it.is possible that manuscript rough drafts for a few of the poems can be found in Box 2, along with another version of Signature Upon Rock. The main part of the correspondence covers the years from 1933 to 1969, and relates primarily to Mrs. Hardy's poetry, although about twenty personal letters are filed separately in another folder. Two scrapbooks contain clippings and correspondence from 1924 to 1963 and also contain a few poems written and published by Mrs. Hardy before her marriage. A folder of original manuscript material includes letters written by Mrs. Hardy, biographical information on other poets, and lecture notes. A few copies of The Asian Story, a group of poems written shortly before Mrs. Hardy's death, can be found as enclosures in letters written in 1967.

Although most of the items relate primarily to Mrs. Hardy, a few of the clippings refer to her friends. A few of the letters are from or to her daughter, Mrs. Husson, and are preserved in a separate file. There are also a few gift poems written by other poets and dedicated to Mrs. Hardy. Box 4 contains issues of poetry journals, most of which contain poems by Mrs. Hardy.

Subject(s):
Poetry
Correspondence
Hardy, Elizabeth Stanton, 1876-1969
Poets, American
Immediate Source of Acquisition
Gift of Mrs. Gustave Husson on May 25, 1981.Access
The Elizabeth Stanton Hardy papers is open for research use. Researchers are advised to contact Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation prior to visiting. Upon arrival, researchers will also be asked to fill out a registration form and provide photo identification.Use
Reproductions are made upon request but can be subject to restrictions. Permission to publish materials from the collection must currently be requested. Please note that some materials may be copyrighted or restricted. It is the researcher's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other case restrictions when publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the collections. For more information contact rarebks@library.rochester.eduCitation
[Item title, item date], Elizabeth Stanton Hardy papers, D.199, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester
Administrative Information
Author: Finding aid prepared by Rare Books and Special Collections staff
Publisher: Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester
Address:
Rush Rhees Library
Second Floor, Room 225
Rochester, NY 14627-0055
rarebks@library.rochester.edu
URL:


Content List
Box 1, Folder 1Key to folders 1:2 - 1:6
Box 1, Folder 2"Metaphoric Season"
Box 1, Folder 3"Mercurial Border"
Box 1, Folder 4"Invisible, They Crowd the Sail"
Box 1, Folder 5"Areas of Immortality"
Box 1, Folder 6"Now Great Orion Circling with the Night"
Box 1, Folder 7Signature Upon Rock
Box 1, Folder 8Poems A - F
Box 1, Folder 9Poems G - P
Box 1, Folder 10Poems R - Z
Box 2, Folder 1Biographical information
Box 2, Folder 2Original manuscript material
Box 2, Folder 3ADAM interview
Box 2, Folder 4Poetry manuscripts
Box 2, Folder 5Poetry manuscripts
Box 2, Folder 6Signature Upon Rock
Box 2, Folder 7"Meditation Upon the Mount of Time" manuscripts
Box 2, Folder 8The Asian Story manuscripts
Box 2, Object 9Scrapbook: chiefly correspondence 1940-41 re Time in the Turning
Box 3, Folder 1Scrapbook - mostly clippings, but with a few letters
Box 3, Folder 2Loose clippings
Box 3, Folder 3Personal correspondence, 1933 - 1969
Box 3, Folder 4Business correspondence, 1933 - 1959
Box 3, Folder 5Business correspondence, 1960 - 1969
Box 3, Folder 6Correspondence re autobiography, 1949-1950
Box 3, Folder 7Poems and hymns
Box 3, Folder 8Typescript - words in action
Box 3, Folder 9Poems by other poets
Box 3, Folder 10Correspondence - Mrs. Husson
Box 3, Folder 11Awards
Box 3, Folder 12Photograph
Box 4, Volume 1-10The Gleam, 10 vols., 1923-1967
Box 4, Object 1-2Record of poems sent to publishers, 2 sets of index cards
Box 4, Volume 1-3Voices, 3 vols., 1963-1965
Box 4, Volume 1-3The Laurel Review, 3 vols., 1967-1968
Box 4, Volume 1-3The Lyric, 3 vols., 1961-1966
Box 4, Volume 1The Fiddlehead, 1 vol., Fall 1957
Box 4, Volume 1University of Rochester library bulletin, Fall 1968
Box 4, Volume 1-2Touchstone, 2 vols., 1968-1970
Box 4, Volume 1-2Imprint quarterly, 2 vols., 1967-1968
Box 4, Volume 1Poetry Society of America bulletin, May 1969
Box 4, Folder 1The Delta Review, November-December 1969
Box 4, Folder 2ADAM, 1970


Other Views:  Print/PDF  |  EAD