Schuyler Colfax Papers

In line with the University of Rochester’s recommendations regarding COVID-19, the Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation will be closed to the public until further notice, effective Monday, March 16, 2020.

Other Views:  Print/PDF  |  EAD Note: You may browse using the navigation on the left, or use Ctrl-F to search within this finding aid.

Schuyler Colfax papers
Creator: Colfax, Schuyler, 1823-1885
Call Number: A.C68
Dates: 1841-1885
Physical Description: 2 boxes
Language(s): Materials are in English
Repository: Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester

Table of Contents:

Biographical/Historical Note
Subject(s)
Immediate Source of Acquisition
Access
Use
Citation
Content List
Collection Overview
Title: Schuyler Colfax papers
Creator: Colfax, Schuyler, 1823-1885
Call Number: A.C68
Dates: 1841-1885
Physical Description: 2 boxes
Language(s): Materials are in English
Repository: Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester

Biographical/Historical Note
Schuyler Colfax (1823-1885) was born in New York City, but moved to Carlisle, Indiana in 1834. Active in the organization of the Republican Party in Indiana, Colfax was elected to The House of Representatives in 1855. From 1863-1869 he was Speaker of the House. His longest and most important service was chairman of the Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads. His speakership and "advanced ideas on Negro suffrage" commended him as a candidate for vice-president, and in 1868 he was elected to that office, serving under President Ulysses S. Grant. He was considered as a presidential candidate in 1872, but was defeated at the Philadelphia convention. Soon after he was offered the editorship of the New York Tribune, but declined. Although never formally charged, he was implicated in the Credit Mobilier scandal, and his political career was ended. His later years were devoted to lecturing and to the Indiana Odd Fellows.

Subject(s):
Politics and government
Correspondence
Scrapbooks
Colfax, Schuyler, 1823-1885
Vice-Presidents
Immediate Source of Acquisition
Presented to the Library by Mrs. Harold C. Townson, March 1946.Access
The Schuyler Colfax papers is open for research use. Researchers are advised to contact Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation prior to visiting. Upon arrival, researchers will also be asked to fill out a registration form and provide photo identification.Use
Reproductions are made upon request but can be subject to restrictions. Permission to publish materials from the collection must currently be requested. Please note that some materials may be copyrighted or restricted. It is the researcher's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other case restrictions when publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the collections. For more information contact rarebks@library.rochester.eduCitation
[Item title, item date], Schuyler Colfax papers, A.C68, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester
Administrative Information
Author: Finding aid prepared by Rare Books and Special Collections staff
Publisher: Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester
Address:
Rush Rhees Library
Second Floor, Room 225
Rochester, NY 14627-0055
rarebks@library.rochester.edu
URL:


Content List
Box 1, Folder 1Letters, 1841-1863
George W. Colfax to Schuyler Colfax, 1841 April 16
G. Morris to Schuyler Colfax, 1841 December 9
C. F. Clarkson to Schuyler Colfax, 1847 August 2
This letter contains a certificate designating Colfax a Deputy Grand Worthy Patriarch in The Sons of Temperance, State of Indiana.

Horace Greeley to Schuyler Colfax, 1849 August 2
Schuyler Colfax to W. J. Walker, 1855 June 27
Schuyler Colfax to unknown recipient, 1855 December 18
Schuyler Colfax to George C. Whiting, 1858 May 12
Schuyler Colfax to unknown recipient, 1861 July 7
R. E Bryant and Lewis Wallace toSchuyler Colfax, 1862 January 12
S. R. Curtis to Schuyler Colfax, 1863 January 11
J. V. Hoit to Schuyler Colfax, 1863 April 26
Milton M. Baggs to Schuyler Colfax, 1863 December 28
Box 1, Folder 2Letters, 1864-1867
The eleven letters in this folder are from political and military persons at the close of the Civil War and into the Reconstruction, are mainly in praise of Colfax's eloquence and high principles.

Mark L. DeMotte to Schuyler Colfax, 1864 January 24
W. J. P. White to Schuyler Colfax, 1864 January 27
John M. Duddy to Schuyler Colfax, 1864 April 16
Horatio King to Schuyler Colfax, 1865 December 14
Horatio King to Schuyler Colfax, 1865 December 14
Jasper Packard to Schuyler Colfax, 1865 December 29
J. T. Fremont to Charles Sumner, 1866 April 12
Sumner forwarded this letter to Colfax.

C. V. Waite to Schuyler Colfax, 1866 December 29
Horace Greeley to Schuyler Colfax, 1867 January 6
John Sherman to Schuyler Colfax, 1867 October 20
Henry B. Carrington to Schuyler Colfax, 1867 November 9
Box 1, Folder 3Letters, 1868-1869
This folder includes twelve letters to Colfax, concerned with the possible impeachment of Andrew Johnson and urging Colfax to run for President.

John A. Kress to Schuyler Colfax, 1868 January 7
Alexander Hamilton to Schuyler Colfax, 1868 February 17
D. W. Voyles to Schuyler Colfax, 1868 May 12
H. S. Towle to Schuyler Colfax, 1868 May 15
John Russell Young to Schuyler Colfax, 1868 June 8
Samuel Sinclair to Schuyler Colfax, 1868 November 19
C. M. Smith to Schuyler Colfax, 1868 November 27
George W. Smalley to Schuyler Colfax, 1868 December 1
C. H. Webb to Schuyler Colfax, 1868 December 6
Joseph Young to Schuyler Colfax, 1868 December 11
John Charles Fremont to Schuyler Colfax, 18-- July 13
Schuyler Hamilton to Schuyler Colfax, 1869 January 7
Box 1, Folder 4Letters, 1870-1871
This folder includes thirteen letters, most requesting political or military appointments. Moses C. Tyler, historian and editor, writes "it is your destiny and duty to be President (of the U.S.)."

James S. Brisbin to Schuyler Colfax, 1870 January 15
J. M. Ashley to Schuyler Colfax 1870, February 28
Lewis Wallace to Schuyler Colfax 1870, August 23
U[lysses]. S. Grant to Schuyler Colfax, 1870 December 16
H. L. Dawes to Schuyler Colfax, 1871 January 14
Moses C. Tyler to Schuyler Colfax, 1871 March 8
Samuel Sinclair to Schuyler Colfax, 1871 May 5
H. B. Anthony to Schuyler Colfax, 1871 June 9
Whitelaw Reid to Schuyler Colfax, 1871 July 3
Whitelaw Reid to Schuyler Colfax, 1871 July 3
George William Curtis to Schuyler Colfax, 1871 September 17
H. S. Lane to Schuyler Colfax 1871, October 17
William Bross to Schuyler Colfax 1871, November 1
Box 1, Folder 5Letters, 1872-1873, undated
This folder contains twelve letters, many showing support for Colfax or asking him to speak on behalf of The Republican Party.

James G. Blaine to Schuyler Colfax, 1872 July 27
Rumsey Wing to Schuyler Colfax, 1872 October 14
T. A. Hendricks to Schuyler Colfax, 1872 October 18
C. A. Trowbridge to Schuyler Colfax, 1872 October 19
H. B. Anthony to Schuyler Colfax, 1872 November 1
Schuyler Colfax to Samuel Sinclair, 1872 December 13
Theodore S. Cuyler to Schuyler Colfax, 1872 December 18
James A. Elm to Schuyler Colfax, 1873 March 26
O. O. Howard to Schuyler Colfax, 1873 December 31
Schuyler Colfax to J. W. Harper, 1874 July 27
William I. Palmer to Schuyler Colfax, 1874 August 19
Charles Sumner to Schuyler Colfax, undated
Box 1, Folder 6Miscelleaneous
1. Testimonial from the City of Victoria, Vancouver Island, July 27, 1865
2. Memorial on Colfax's death from the I.O.O.F. of Indiana (1885)
3. Two thirty shilling notes - 1758 and 1762, and a handwritten card, "Thos Hendrichs"
Box 2, Volume 1-2Scrapbooks of newspaper clippings
Volume 1: Contains mounted clippings of Colfax's 1868 political speeches in Indiana newspapers; then countrywide in 1869 when he was vice-president. His audiences ranged from the National Convention of Colored Men to The Congressional Temperance Society, and included a speech before Salt Lake City Mormons, in which he "attacked with unsparing vigor the Mormon practice of polygamy." Articles by Colfax published in The Independent include "Gem of Western Scenery," "How To Be Happy," "The Sabbath School Clause," and "The Northern Pacific Railroad: Will it Pay?" An article (May 26, 1871) entitled "Is the Vice-President Dying" tells of Colfax having severe vertigo and falling insensible to the Senate floor. An 1880 speech in South Bend give his account of the Crédit Mobilier scandal. There are several enclosures, including a newspaper account of the Aldine Dinner (Feb. 23, 1872) in New York, at which Colfax and Samuel Clemens were among the speakers; an envelope covered with, and containing, handwritten notes, and a newspaper article (1885) on the Amoor Gold Mines.

Volume 2: Contains 1868 Republican political platform speeches, plus acceptance speeches of both Colfax and Grant. Later topics are polygamy, prison labor, and temperance. There are eight "Capitol Reminiscences" by Colfax - on Lincoln, Horace Greeley, Edwin M. Stanton and others. Enclosures include a newspaper article on a summer resort in Colfax, Iowa ("a gem of a new hotel"); a speech in defense of James G. Blaine; an article from the Chicago Inter-Ocean (Jan. 1882) regarding the trial of Charles Guiteau, President Garfield's assassin; obituaries of Evelyn Colfax (first wife - d. 1863) and Hannah Matthews (mother - d. 1872).



Other Views:  Print/PDF  |  EAD