Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers

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Collection Overview
Title: Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers
Creator: Hooker, Isabella Beecher, 1822-1907
Call Number: D.292
Dates: 1867-1889
Physical Description: 7 boxes
Language(s): Materials are in English
Repository: Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation

Biographical/Historical Note
Isabella Beecher Hooker (1822–1907) was a profound influence on the suffrage movement through her close work with Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA); only recently has her life and contributions to the suffrage movement begun to be examined in depth. Hooker was daughter of the Reverend Lyman Beecher and a half-sister of Henry Ward Beecher, Catharine Beecher, and Harriet Beecher Stowe. She was a leader, lecturer and activist in the American suffragist movement who participated in the founding of the New England Women Suffrage Association and founded the Connecticut Women Association and Society for the Study of Political Science. She was a friend to both Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and helped them found the National Woman Suffrage Association. Her friends and associates also included Olympia Brown, Lucy Stone, Victoria Woodhull and Paulina Wright Davis among many other luminaries in the suffrage movement. Mrs. Hooker, together with her husband, John Hooker, a prominent Connecticut attorney and judge, wrote and presented a bill to the Connecticut General Assembly in 1870 that provided married women with property rights. Although the bill was initially rejected, Hooker reintroduced it every year until it passed in 1877. In 1870, she traveled throughout the mid-west on her first Suffrage speaking tour. This first of many tours was in preparation for the 1871 Washington, D. C. suffrage convention that Mrs. Hooker organized at her own expense, “for the purpose of calling the attention of Congress to the fact that women were already citizens of the United States under the Constitution, interpreted by the Declaration of Independence; [women only] needed recognition from that body to become voters.” Hooker spoke at the 1871 congressional hearing in response to the convention, and the National Woman Suffrage Association presented Hooker’s constitutional argument as a petition in favor of women’s suffrage to Congress at that time. Hooker worked for over thirty years to forward the cause of woman suffrage.

Access
The Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers is open for research use. Researchers are advised to contact Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation prior to visiting. Upon arrival, researchers will also be asked to fill out a registration form and provide photo identification.Use
Reproductions are made upon request but can be subject to restrictions. Permission to publish materials from the collection must currently be requested. Please note that some materials may be copyrighted or restricted. It is the researcher's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other case restrictions when publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the collections. For more information contact rarebks@library.rochester.eduScope and Content
The collection consists of letters written by and to Isabella Beecher Hooker (1822-1907) and her husband John Hooker (1816-1901). Included are almost daily reports from Isabella Beecher Hooker to her husband written from Washington, DC where, on January 12, 1872, she and Susan B. Anthony testified on behalf of a federal woman suffrage amendment before a hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Most of the other letters pertain to the Beecher-Tilton Scandal. The scandal, which was a national sensation, became public in 1872 when Victoria Woodhull accused Isabella's half-brother Henry Ward Beecher of having an adulterous affair with Elizabeth Tilton, one of his parishioners and wife of his friend Theodore Tilton. The letters from Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Olympia Brown and others reveal the impact the scandal had on the women's rights movement and its leaders.

Like Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Hooker carefully saved her correspondence and papers related to the suffrage movement, so this archive contains a broad array of opinions and ideas from the early suffragists and provides a look at their interpersonal relationships.

The addition to the collection, which begins in Box 2 includes: over 100 letters written between the years of 1869 and 1880 by suffrage leaders and activists including 27 letters from Susan B. Anthony, 12 letters and notes from Elizabeth Cady Stanton, 16 letters from Olympia Brown, 11 letters from Henry Blackwell (many on The Woman’s Journal Letterhead), 9 letters from Paulina Wright Davis, 2 letters from Matilda Joslyn Gage, 4 letters from the Reverend Phoebe Hanaford, 1 letter from Mary Livermore, 2 letters from Caroline Severance, and 2 letters from Lucy Stone. This series also contains 16 letters to Mrs. Hooker from less well known suffrage activists; 95 letters from members of her family; 47 letters from friends and acquaintances and a letter from Edwin M. Stanton, who served as President Lincoln’s Secretary of War that was used as a pass to a restricted area.


Immediate Source of Acquisition
Box 1 was purchased from Timothy Fagan (10/2/2001, 11/2/2001, 11/15/2002, 10/20/05, 11/5/05, 7/1/2006) on various funds. Boxes 2-4 were purchased from Austin Abbey Rare Books and The Colebrook Book Barn, in 2016.Citation
[Item title, item date], Isabella Beecher Hooker and John Hooker Papers, D.292, Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation, River Campus Libraries, University of Rochester
Administrative Information
Author: Finding aid prepared by Rare Books and Special Collections staff
Publisher: Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation
Address:
Rush Rhees Library
Second Floor, Room 225
Rochester, NY 14627-0055
rarebks@library.rochester.edu
URL: http://www.library.rochester.edu/rbscp


Content List
Correspondence, 1869-1877
Box 1Correspondence, 1869-1877
Folder 1Correspondence, 1869-1871
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, November 21, [1869]
Folder 2Correspondence, January 1-19, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 8, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 9, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 10, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 13, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 14, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 15, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 16, 1872 January 16, 1872
Enclosed with this letter is a newspaper article: "Forty-Second Congress. Second Session. Yesterday's Proceedings." National Republican January 16, 1872

"Forty-Second Congress. Second Session. Yesterday's Proceedings." National Republican, January 16, 1872
Newspaper article was enclosed with letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 16, 1872.

Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 17, 1872
Folder 3Correspondence, January 20-31, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 20, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 23, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 24, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 25, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 26, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 27, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 28, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 29, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 30, 1872
Enclosed with this letter is a broadsheet: "To the Editors of the United States."

"To the Editors of the United States", Undated
Broadsheet enclosed with letter from January 30, 1872

Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 31, 1872
Folder 4Correspondence, February 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 1, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 2, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 4, 1872 January 30, 1872
Enclosed with this letter is a newspaper article: "Washington...The Strong Minded Women Coalescing with the 'Liberal Republicans.'" New York Herald, January 30, 1872.

Newspaper article: "Washington...The Strong Minded Women Coalescing with the 'Liberal Republicans.'" New York Herald, January 30, 1872
Enclosed with letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 4, 1872.

Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 6, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 10, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 11, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 12, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 13, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 14, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 15, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, February 18, 1872
Folder 5Correspondence, March-November 9, 1872
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to Victoria Woodhull, August 5, 1872 Letter from Victoria Woodhull to Isabella Beecher Hooker, [August 6, 1872]
This letter is written as a response, on the same page as Hooker's August 5, 1872 letter.

Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, November 3, 1872 Letter from Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 7, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, November 9, 1872 Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 9, 1872
Folder 6Correspondence, November 10-December 1872
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 16, 1872
This letter is a copy.

Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, November 17, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, November 22, 1872 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, December 4, 1872 Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to Isabella Beecher Hooker, [1872]
Folder 7Correspondence, 1873
Letter from Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 6, [1873] Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to Elizabeth Tilton, January 7, 1873 Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 6, 1873
Folder 8Correspondence, January-September 11, 1874
Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 12, 1874 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, August 20, 1874 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, September 3, 1874 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, September 7, 1874 Letter from John Hooker to Francis Moulton, September 7, 1874
This letter is a copy.

Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, September 10, 1874 Letter from Olympia Brown to John Hooker, September 11, 1874
Folder 9Correspondence, September 12-December 1874
Letter from Elizabeth Cady Stanton to John Hooker, September 23, 1874 Letter from Harriet Beecher Stowe to John Hooker, September 27, 1874 Letter from Susan B. Anthony to John Hooker, October 2, 1874 Letter from Susan T. Howard to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 24, 1874
Folder 10Correspondence, January-February 1875
Letter from Elizabeth Cady Stanton to John Hooker, January 8, 1875 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to John Hooker, January 18, 1875 Letter from Susan B. Anthony to John Hooker, January 20, 1875 Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, February 28, 1875
Folder 11Correspondence, March 1875-1877
Letter from Catherine Beecher to John Hooker, March 15, 1875 Letter from Henry Ward Beecher to John Hooker, March 19, 1875 Letter from Thomas G. Shearman to John Hooker, April 16, 1875 Letter from E.B. Fairfield to John Hooker, October 10, 1877
Folder 12John Hooker, March 1876
"Statement of John Hooker with regard to a conversation at Brooklyn, N.Y. March 21st 1876 with Thomas G. Shearman, Esq. With regard to the Beecher-Tilton matter.", March 21, 1876
Folder 13Newspaper article, Woman's Suffrage, [1872]
"Woman's Suffrage. The Petition for a Declaratory Act", [1872]
Folder 14Photograph of Isabella Beecher Hooker, 1868-1880
Photograph of Isabella Beecher Hooker with a signed autograph sentiment, 1868-1880
The sentiment reads: "The World is my Country- To do good is my Religion." Isabella Beecher Hooker.

Correspondence, 1868-1880
This addition to the collection includes: over 100 letters written between the years of 1869 and 1880 by suffrage leaders and activists including 27 letters from Susan B. Anthony, 12 letters and notes from Elizabeth Cady Stanton, 16 letters from Olympia Brown, 11 letters from Henry Blackwell (many on The Woman’s Journal Letterhead), 9 letters from Paulina Wright Davis, 2 letters from Matilda Joslyn Gage, 4 letters from the Reverend Phoebe Hanaford, 1 letter from Mary Livermore, 2 letters from Caroline Severance, and 2 letters from Lucy Stone. This series also contains 16 letters to Hooker from less well known suffrage activists; 95 letters from members of her family; 47 letters from friends and acquaintances and a letter from Edwin M. Stanton, who served as President Lincoln’s Secretary of War that was used as a pass to a restricted area.
The material described below was purchased from Austin Abbey Rare Books and The Colebrook Book Barn, in 2016.
Please note that some envelopes have multiple letters in them; these letters have been left as they were found; Hooker seemed to pair letters with similar content, and many letters were circulated by their recipients to additional recipients.

Box 2Suffrage Correspondence, 1869-1879
Susan B. Anthony Correspondence
Folder 11869-May 1871
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 6, 1869
Anthony asks Hooker to write for The Revolution. She says: "you were going to give me a "spicy"- that the word- article on your views & impressions of me & us & the cause of the Revolutioners, weren't you? ... I have the most sublime faith in every earnest woman's instinctive impulse on our great question-" Anthony also asks her to ask Harriet Beecher Stowe to write a series for The Revolution in 1870 that will be to women’s suffrage as Uncle Tom’s Cabin was to the abolition movement. Anthony equates women (including Mrs. Beecher) as slaves to men, having to give them everything.
title: The Revolution

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 11, 1869
Anthony mentions that Mary Livermore will sell The Agitator to “the Boston people” who have organized a stock company for $10,000, and says that Livermore will come east to live, lecture, and edit the paper. Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote a postscript.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 3, 1869
Anthony writes about feelings of loneliness after Stanton leaves on a trip because all of the suffrage workers she trains go off to work elsewhere, rather than staying to help her. She also describes financial difficulties and writes: "the good words of Hartford are of course cheering- but ah my dear friend they don't pay my printer-" In the letter's postscript she mentions having one of Beecher’s speech printed in full.
title: The Revolution

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 22, 1870
Anthony writes that “Turnbull promises to report on main question in writing – if he does and a senatorial discussion comes of it, I shall rejoice.” She then goes on to speak of the National Women's Suffrage Association's (NWSA) work with Congress, specifically with Senator Sumner and Logan, and of Senator Logan (who opposed the NWSA bill), Anthony hoped that Hooker “could spike his gun.” Anthony writes about getting ready to go on another speaking tour, but did not have any new clothes. She tells Hooker to send letters to her Rochester address while she is out speaking and that they would be forwarded. Anthony continues on about the platform of the Working Men’s Convention and how she does not think that they “have the elements to make a formidable movement.” Anthony asks to be kept up to date on the progress in Washington and hopes to get her Senate Committee speech written.
This letter is signed.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 31, 1870
Anthony writes about getting a loan from a man Paulina Wright Davis introduced. He will loan $2000 on condition that Davis and John Hooker sign the note. She also writes of speaking to the Detroit YMCA and says she will “go with the armor of Truth & Justice.”
title: The Revolution

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 20, 1871
Anthony writes about her hopes that suffrage publications, including History of the Suffrage movement by Paulina Wright Davis, Mrs. Stanton’s speech, and the Woodhull Memorial will make money. Anthony tells Hooker to have patience with Davis’s gossip.
This letter is signed.

Susan B. Anthony to Josephine S. Griffing, May 21, 1871
Anthony writes about the California campaign. She also describes a letter she wrote to Paulina Wright Davis in which she "owned up that I had told Hooker of all of her criticisms and objections to her- & begged her to join with me & all of us in an effort to make us rule for any other than each for number one- If we only can come to that principle - we shall hear much less talk about others-"
This letter is signed.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, ca. May 22, 1871
This letter is signed, and was in an envelope postmarked May 22, 1871, with the May 21, letter to Griffing.

Folder 2September 1871-1873
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 23, 1871
Anthony writes about conditions in Washington Territory where she is engaged to speak. She mentions that women in the Territory already have the right to vote. Anthony mentions that she feels that Stanton is not working her fair share because of her childcare responsibilities. Anthony asks Hooker to write the call to the upcoming convention and have Stanton sign it.
This letter is signed, but signature cut out. The stamp has been torn or cut off, which left holes in the letter's pages.

Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, October 22, 1871
Anthony writes from Olympia, Washington. She is going to Victoria and Vancouver to canvass. Anthony writes about addressing the Washington Territory legislature in a packed hall, arguing that women need suffrage because of the 15th Amendment.
This letter is signed, but signature is torn or cut off, which left holes in the letter's pages. It is in same envelope as the Anthony letter dated September 23, 1871.

Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, December 17, 1871
Anthony writes about her reception in San Francisco and addresses to the California legislature, and that her speeches in California were meet with huge ovations. She asks Stanton to complete all resolutions for the convention. Anthony mentions that Laura De Force Gordon was unanimously selected as a delegate to the suffrage convention.
This letter is initialed.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 1, 1872
Anthony asks Hooker's opinion of a draft speech, since she has not written her own remarks in several years. Anthony also mentions the formation of a stock company.
This letter is signed.

Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, February 17, 1873
Anthony writes about her speaking engagements, and her visit to Martha Coffin Wright and that she missed having Stanton's presence there. Anthony also describes the organization of the upcoming May meeting.
This letter is initialed, and was in the same envelope as Anthony's May 27, 1873 letter.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 19, 1873
The content of this letter refers to Anthony's 1872 trial for illegal voting, and so the letter has been dated by department staff as 1873, and not 1870.
Anthony writes about canvassing Monroe County so as to get her side of the case out to prospective jurors. She expresses a feeling of being alone, and hopes Hooker can come support her at the trial. Anthony writes: "But must not fail to be there- for we must make the Welkin ring anew with our War cry for freedom- & our constitutional right to protect it by the ballot- I hear nothing from nobody- all I can do is to run & jump to accomplish the half I see waiting before me."
This letter is signed, and is in same envelope as an Anthony letter dated May 27, 1873. Please note the year written on this letter appears as if it is 1870.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 1, 1873
Mrs. Hallowell likely refers to Mary Post Hallowell, Isaac Post's eldest child. Isaac and Amy lived in Rochester and were close friends of Anthony, and fellow activists.
Anthony expresses concern that Hooker will “stay away” from the convention, and how some might interpret that conflict within the suffrage movement. Anthony asks Hooker to write a letter to be read to the convention, and she asks her opinion on recent Supreme Court suffrage decisions. Anthony concludes the letter with a strong statement regarding the lack of freedom in the United States. She writes: "Supreme Court decision- - Two bloody revolutions & one hundred years struggle for freedom- & only one million black male citizens actual possessed of it-" On the verso of the letter, Anthony tells Hooker "My friend Mrs. Hallowell- will be very happy to entertain you at time of my trial should you decide to go to Rochester- I do long for a chat with you-"
This letter is signed, and was in the same envelope as Anthony's May 27, 1873 letter.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 25, 1873
The content of this letter refers to Anthony's 1872 trial for illegal voting, and so the letter has been dated by department staff as 1873, and not 1870.
Anthony writes about postponement of the trial, possible bench warrant, and the newspaper coverage of her trial.
This letter is signed, and is in same envelope as an Anthony letter dated May 27, 1873. Please note the year written on this letter appears as if it is 1870.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 27, 1873
The content of this letter refers to Anthony's 1872 trial for illegal voting, and so the letter has been dated by department staff as 1873, and not 1870.
Anthony writes the betrayal of confidences which likely refers to Victoria (presumably Woodhull), who Anthony believes fails to tell the truth, and says she will not address the Beecher-Tilton affair. She disagrees with Woodhull that social equality should come before political equality. Anthony speaks of her own battle with the U.S. Court of Appeals and the manipulative U.S. District Attorney assigned to her case, and how District Attorney moved the case out of Rochester to Canandaigua. Anthony expresses the hope that Hooker will come to her support in Canandaigua; and ends with a lament how she cannot tend to a very sick sister because of the trial. Anthony says: “this trial postponement upsets all my plans for a little quiet with my loved and loving family circle – All the rest of you may know such joy – but I never.”
This letter is signed, and is in same envelope as an Anthony letter dated May 27, 1873. Please note the year written on this letter appears as if it is 1870.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 17, 1873
Anthony writes about a lecture tour and wants to know if Hooker can guarantee full audiences in Connecticut for the whole month since she asks Anthony to lecture there. Anthony says: "it seems to me there can be no doubt about your name & mine together, drawing full houses."
This letter is signed, and is on National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) letterhead.

Folder 31847-1879, undated
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 9, 1874
Anthony writes that she is unhappy with Stanton because she leaves to go on a speaking tour for pay while asking other volunteers to speak on her behalf at an upcoming May meeting. Anthony says that according to Stanton: "you can get along without me with Phebe [Burgous?]- now isn't that decidely cool? ... But for drill service- for a drag horse - she is not, and cannot be- and it is no use for us to expect it- So I am schooling myself into submission to the inevitable - again- for after all I know the success of our May meeting is not dependent on her presence or absence --" Anthony concludes by reflecting about the possible work women could do for the poor, criminal and insane if they had power through the ballot. She writes: "now wouldn't it be splendid for us to be free & equal citizens- with the power of the ballot to back our hearts, heads & hands- and we could just go into all the movements to better the conditions of the poor, the insane, the criminal- wouldn't we be happy mortals than to work with power too - I can hardly wait- the good fates though are working together to bring us into this freedom & that rapidly-"
This letter is signed.

Susan B. Anthony to Olympia Brown, April 10, 1874
Anthony writes about her mother’s failing health, and the changes they are making to the house to be able to make room for "brother McLean"- her sister's husband. Anthony also describes the planning for the upcoming national meeting in New Jersey, to be held in May. She reports: "It seems as if nobody cared a [pip?] for holding up our national plan any more- while it does seem to me we ought to do so religiously- and unless I shall be made to see it of no importance - I must work on to secure a good N.J. meeting-"
This letter is an unsigned fragment.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 13, 1878
Anthony writes about how she wants to visit everyone in the movement to see the progress being made, but knows that is impossible. She continues to describe her mother's worsening condition, and that she must do it as their care-giver got married. Says also that Slayton is going to give her a "New England Route" in November and December (presumably for a speaking tour) and that she hopes that she can visit Hooker. Anthony then refer to the ongoing Tilton-Beecher scandal and writes: "my heart aches for her -- But I can see nothing that I can do to help her- the world is sick to death of the whole affair - and whether she speaks the truth or a lie- it wont [sic] believe her any the more... the part that she told me her story in 1870- as she now tells it to the public... and now, more than ever before- is it wise for all outsiders to keep outside." Anthony goes on to ask that Hooker stay on with the national organization until after the next convention as she fears Hooker’s public withdrawal from the NWSA "would look like a quarrel..."
6 pages

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 20, 1878
Anthony asks Hooker if she will call the Washington Convention for the second week of December, when Senator Hoar will make the Minority Report. Anthony goes on to imply that Stanton does not want to go to any more national conventions. Anthony describes the reasoning behind removing [Sara Spencer?] from a position within NWSA and writes: "Of course - as usual- Susan is the chief sinner- whereas Susan feels now & has all the time- but too profoundly thankful to have the work done- to complain of the exact manner of doing- Hear greatest fault is charging lack of principle, lack of earnestness, lack of virtue ever- or every one who dissent from her- or criticises her- [brings?] this up"
Senator Hoar's report can be found in Box 4, folder 10.
This letter is initialed.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 12, 1879
Anthony writes from Stanton's home in Tenafly, New Jersey that she’s on her way to Hartford and would like to visit, and hopes Hooker will be there. Anthony writes that she hopes Hooker will help her to schedule a hearing before the Connecticut legislature.
This letter is signed.

Susan B. Anthony to Paulina Wright Davis
Anthony writes that the new suffrage workers want their expenses paid, but that she, herself works without compensation. Anthony shares her concerns at having to sell the rights of The Revolution to a stock company. She discusses the company and the process of borrowing money in detail. Davis writes about her deteriorating relationship with Lucy Stone, and also comments on the stock company that Anthony mentioned. Davis notes: "poor Susan I know just how she feels it is a heartbreaking thing to yield a pet like this to the cold work Heaven help her for men are hard and women weak & jealous."
This letter is unsigned. Davis writes comments on the verso.

Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Anthony writes while canvassing in California, about her speaking engagements in Petaluma, Healdsburg, Marysville, Stockton, San Jose, and Santa Cruz. Anthony believes her speeches are being successful.
This letter is initialed.

Folder 4Susan B. Anthony, and related Correspondence, 1870
Susan B. Anthony to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Anthony writes that she would like Hooker to go to the Washington Convention. Anthony lists the Association members that will be there, and says that there will be “a fine lot of women and good clothes too – all but Susan – and no matter for hers – nobody expects her to appear in `store clothes’.“ Anthony writes that she is glad to hear that Hooker wrote a kind letter to Davis. Anthony also suggests plans for a Connecticut meeting and asks for Hooker’s decisions.
This letter is initialed. The envelope also includes two undated notes from Stanton and a note from Esther Jewell to Stanton.

Esther Jewell to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, October 9, [1870]
Jewell invites Stanton to stay with her during the upcoming Connecticut women's rights convention.
This letter is initialed. The envelope also includes two undated notes from Stanton and this note from Esther Jewell to Stanton.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, 1870
Stanton writes that she has forwarded Hooker’s letter about Davis to Davis. Stanton expresses interest in Hooker writing a biographical piece about Davis’s spiritual life. Stanton hopes that Hooker might “overlook the weak points in a character and see what is grand and noble.” Stanton goes on ask if Hooker will be at the upcoming Washington convention because “your presence gives me great strength and as we have alike a keen sense of the ridiculous, I enjoy with you an occasional laugh at the follies we cannot ignore.”
This letter is signed. The envelope also includes two undated notes from Stanton and this note from Esther Jewell to Stanton.

Folder 5Elizabeth Cady Stanton Correspondence, 1869
Three letters originally housed in a single envelope relate to each other and the developing crisis with Lucy Stone. This series of letters started with a letter (absent from this archive) from Caroline M. Severance to Hooker asking her to speak for Stanton and others at the Newport Convention. Caroline M. Severance forwards Hooker’s response to Davis, who replies to Hooker, enclosing Stanton’s letter on the subject.

Isabella Beecher Hooker to Caroline M. Severance, ca. August 1869
Hooker writes that Davis and Anthony should speak for themselves at the upcoming convention. Or Stanton should be the representative, and not her in their place. Hooker goes on to discuss key issues and states: "Whether I can go as far as she [Stanton?] in their support will depend on Miss Stanton's position in the matter of dress & divorce. I care nothing for the 15th Amend[ment] anyway. That whole discussion will either be set aside by its passage or become the order of the day by its failure & then, we shall all have to take it up in earnest as a political issue & then I think it will never pass without the 16th."
This letter is initialed.

Paulina Wright Davis to "My Dear Sister", ca. August 1869
Davis writes, presumably to Hooker, about the deteriorating relationships among those in the women's movement, and the abolitionist movement. She says: "I am certain that these miserable quarrels among reformers do more harm than any and all other things combined. Look at Mr. Garrison's position in feud with half his old warm friends. Phillips with his hand against everyman not on some great principle but some miserable permeability. The Mrs. Ball at war with all the women in Boston or they with her... we don't deserve justice until we learn mercy so each others faults... I pity Lucy Stone from my heart I believe she is at times insane or I think she could not do what she does but I could not trust any profession of friendship from her and this is more than I ever said to anyone else about her but I went through such a bitter experience years ago and learned then to stand alone. I pity Elizabeth Stanton too not in the same way she is grieved, hurt pierced to the very heart, a whole avalanche of rude [illegible] beside the hard thrusts of criticism."
This letter is initialed.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Paulina Wright Davis, August 10, 1869
Stanton writes to Davis that she feels as though Thomas Wentworth Higginson does not understand her. Stanton goes on to say: "I dread conventions more than I can tell and if you are all willing I will never show my face in one again, the behavior of reformers, the scandalous talk of Lucy Stone..."
title: The Revolution

Folder 6Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and related Correspondence, 1871
Susan B. Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, 1871
Anthony writes that she is starting overland to San Francisco, and expects to arrive December 1. She will then go to convention in Sacramento December 5 and 6, and then to the Nevada state convention with Laura De Force Gordon, then on to Wyoming, Utah, Nebraska and Iowa, and will “take things by storm all along the line”. Anthony encourages Stanton to go to the Washington convention, and says that Washington Territory and Oregon have made Anthony their representative in Washington.
This letter is signed, and is in the same envelope dated December 1871.

Mrs. A. H. Walker to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, December 4, 1871
Walker writes to Stanton on behalf of the St. Johns Suffrage Association in Michigan imploring her to come and speak to the community. Walker laments that they may not be able to raise the speaker, but that Stanton's voice and leadership is needed there. Walker states: "Oh! My Dear Mrs Stanton we need you as a strong tower on which to rest our struggling effort and chain the hearts of our friends." Stanton seems to have forwarded the letter to Hooker, and in a note appended to the end of Mrs. Walker’s letter, asks Hooker and Olympia Brown to come to her home in Tenafly, New Jersey to visit Anthony during Christmas week. Stanton goes on to say that she has so many requests to speak that she could “three times a day, & Sunday too.” Stanton concludes by saying, “Do not for mercy’s sake make me the responsible head. I urged Susan to make you President and not me… I am tired of being a figurehead to be shot at.”
This letter is signed, and is in the same envelope dated December 1871.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton to "Friend", December 10, 1871
This letter was likely written to Hooker. Stanton writes that she has signed the memorial and returned it, and is glad she (likely Hooker) appreciates Olympia Brown. Says that Brown is “a second Susan in pluck & magnanimity,” and that she understood from the beginning that together with [IJG?], Hooker would “steer the ship” at the upcoming Washington convention.
This letter is initialed, and written on Mt. Carroll Seminary letterhead.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 16, 187[1?]
Stanton writes that she hopes Hooker and Brown are working to make the Washington Convention a success. Stanton comments on Anthony lecture tour out west and says that she “is stirring them all along the line” and Laura De Force Gordon is with her. Stanton writes about the benefit of including suffrage songs at the upcoming convention. Stanton also mentioned the impact Julia Griffing's illness has had on planning for the convention and the overall campaign in Washington, D.C.
This letter is initialed, and written on Mt. Carroll Seminary letterhead.

Folder 7Elizabeth Cady Stanton Correspondence, 1874, 1880
Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 2, 1874
Stanton writes that her temperance speeches in Rochester and Detroit had immense audiences. Stanton writes that Hooker is wanted as President for the National Convention next year. She then asks about when Hooker will be leaving for Europe. Stanton shares her impressions of Governor George Bayley, of Michigan and his family, whom she stayed with during a recent campaign.
This letter is signed.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 24, 1880
Stanton asks Hooker for reminiscences for The History of the Woman Suffrage volume that she has begun to work on. Stanton sends regards from Anthony, and asks Hooker about the legislative session. Stanton then writes about not receiving an invitation to a friend's wedding, which might be a reference to Lucy Stone and her family.
This letter is signed, and written on National Woman Suffrage Association letterhead.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Isabella Beecher Hooker, ca. 1880s
Stanton asks Hooker to speak to Henry Beecher about speaking at one of the suffrage meetings. Stanton also asks Hooker to write about Anthony and her impact on the movement for “`The Golden Age’ In Revolution In Woodhull’s.“ Stanton believes that Hooker can write about Anthony's achievements objectively since Stanton feels that Anthony is “too much a part of myself & my work for me to do it.”
This letter is initialed.

[F. J.?] Hallock to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, ca. June 2
This letter is initialed.

Folder 8Henry Browne Blackwell Correspondence, 1870-1874
Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 15, 1870
Henry Browne Blackwell (1825 –1909) was an American advocate for social and economic reform. He was one of the founders of the Republican Party and the American Woman Suffrage Association. He was married to Lucy Stone. Together they founded The Woman's Journal in 1870 in Boston, Massachusetts, as a weekly newspaper. The new paper incorporated Mary A. Livermore's The Agitator, as well as a lesser known periodical called The Woman's Advocate. Contributors included Stone, Blackwell, Mary Livermore, Julia Ward Howe, and Thomas Wentworth Higginson.
Blackwell writes about orders for Hooker’s tracts on the Bible and woman suffrage. He asks for Harriet Beecher Stowe’s address so he can send her a sample copy of The Woman’s Journal.
title: The Woman's Journal

Henry Browne Blackwell to John Hooker, January 24, 1870
In this letter Blackwell may be referring to growing divide in the women's suffrage movement, as Anthony and Stanton focus on a national campaign, while Blackwell and Stone focus on state-wide efforts.
Blackwell suggests that Hooker have his wife's tracts stereotyped so they can be produced whenever an order comes in. Blackwell continues: “My wife Lucy Stone asks me to invite yourself & Mrs. Hooker to come to Boston on the 28th (next Friday) to participate in our meeting to form a Mass[achusetts] W.[oman] S.[uffrage] Assn. I shall be heartily glad to have from you both the same cordial sympathy & cooperation which you have with that in N.Y.”
This letter is signed.

Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 21, 1871
Blackwell encourages Hooker to write a letter for publication in The Woman's Journal describing the suffrage activities of the Connecticut association.
title: The Woman's Journal

Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 26, 1871
Blackwell encourages Hooker to speak at the upcoming Massachusetts convention, and encloses a free pass to the meeting.
title: The Woman's Journal

Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 23, 1872
Blackwell acknowledges Hooker's "suggestion for a conference between the 'Nationals' & 'Americans' with a view to concerted action in the Fall Campaign is both timely and important.... I wish that you, Mrs. Stanton & Miss Anthony could meet Mrs. Livermore, Lucy Stone & myself at some central point... and compare views in advance of the Philadelphia Convention." Blackwell goes on to share his strategy for how to develop influence with the Republican Party. He shares with Hooker his opinion that the only way to obtain women's suffrage is to make "women a power in politics," and approach the Republican Party about making suffrage a plank in their platform. He writes: "Now that Horace Greeley, Murat Halsted Horace White & other bitter opponents of Woman Suffrage have drawn off and the Republican party threatened with serious disintegration, I think there is a Providential opportunity."
title: The Woman's Journal

Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 31, 1872
Blackwell continues to advocate for finding allies within the Republican Party. He concludes the letter: "I am not [sanguine?] of success in Phil.[delphia] We have been too deeply compromised by Mrs. Woodhull's extravagances to command sufficient public confidence & respect at present, I fear. But we must do our best. I am glad you see the necessity of obeying 'elective affinities' in regard to organizations..."
title: The Woman's Journal

Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 10, 1872
title: The Woman's Journal

Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, July 2, 1872
Blackwell offers advice to Hooker for appealing to the Democrats at their upcoming convention in Baltimore. Blackwell suggests that the "Kansas & Iowa Democrats more likely to help you than any others."
title: The Woman's Journal

Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, July 11, 1872
Blackwell responds to news from Hooker and reflects: "I am sorry but not disappointed at the silence of the Democrats on the Woman question- If you had known them as well as I do, you would have realized that, with some honorable exception, they are a century behind the Republicans." Rather than continue with pursuing that strategy, Blackwell advises Hooker: "the only policy that can carry woman suffrage is a policy of conciliation and an uncompromising fidelity to the party that has pledged itself to a respectful consideration of woman's rights."
title: The Woman's Journal

Copies of Woman Suffrage Resolution, October 21, 1871
The resolution was adopted by the Massachusetts State Convention and asks for the right to vote to be extended to "all law-abiding, tax-paying American citizens, and will hail the day when the educated intellect and enlightened woman finds direct expression at the ballot box."
This call was housed in the same envelope as the 1870-1872 letters to Hooker.

Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 8, 1873
Blackwell writes that he must "decline to publish your letter relative to Miss Anthony, because it is based upon a misapprehension of the facts, and [obliterated] judgment, would do injustice both to Miss A. & to the Congress." Blackwell encourages Hooker to form a Woman Suffrage Political Club, based on the example of the Massachusetts Society.
title: The Woman's Journal

Henry Browne Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 2, 1874
Blackwell writes about turning fifty years old and nearing the end of his life. He mentions hosting Susan [B. Anthony] and the "stirring" lecture she gave over the holidays.
title: The Woman's Journal

Sarah Ellen Blackwell to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Sarah Ellen was one of Henry's sisters.
Blackwell writes about not having time to distribute the circulars that she is now forwarding to Hooker. She also recommends that Hooker read the newspaper Voice of Angels, which she describes as a spirit newspaper. Blackwell also recommends a recent book by Emmett Densmore.
This letter is signed.

Henry Browne Blackwell to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, July 11, 1872
Blackwell encourages Stanton to rally support for Ulysses S. Grant and Henry Wilson running on the Republican ticket, as a next step after the Democrats refused to support a women's suffrage plank in their platform at their convention.
title: The Woman's Journal

Folder 9Olympia Brown Correspondence, February 4, 1873-1876
Olympia Brown (1835 –1926) was an American suffragist. She is regarded as the first woman to graduate from a theological school, as well as becoming the first ordained woman minister in the United States by full denominational authority (Unitarian). Brown was also one of the few first generation suffragists who were able to vote with the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment. She formed the New England Women's Suffrage Association, led the Wisconsin Suffrage Association and became the president of the Federal Suffrage Association from 1903 to 1920.

Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 4, 1873
Browne thanks Hooker for the salubrious effect her recent visit had. Browne shares the positive impression that area teachers had of Hooker when she attended their recent meetings.
This letter is signed.

Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 12, 1873
Browne explains her view that conventions should be open to all who support women's rights, and not just for women.
This letter is signed.

Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 12, 1873
Browne shares her displeasure at receiving a letter from Hooker the same day as she sent out the letter described above. Browne chastises Hooker: "as to casting the responsibility of getting up the meeting on me it is absurd, you say you are nearly & are only ^waiting^ till spring to leave the continent & go to Europe well I am weary & I have my household & my parish two sermons every week to be got & meetings three evenings in the week & no sort of hopes of resting in Europe but must stand at my post year after year, now if there is any meeting at New Haven it is evident that you will just have to put your hand to the work." Browne alludes to the Tilton-Beecher scandal as a possible reason why Hooker may not want to plan the upcoming convention. She advises: "just let your brothers affairs rest and attend to this meeting our cause is more important than ten thousand Beechers besides you can do nothing about his affairs he must work out his own salvation or condemnation & we must do likewise & we had better begin it by making this N.[ew] H.[ampshire] meeting a success."
This letter is signed.

Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 9, 1874
Browne writes of the travel plans of Stanton and Anthony to go to Washington, D.C. and her hopes for the upcoming convention in Connecticut. Browne encloses a letter written by a Mr. Chapin to her about possibly bringing Anthony to Connecticut to lecture. His letter is dated January 13, 1874.
This letter is signed.

Unknown writer to "Dear Brownie", January 18, 1874
This letter is believed to have been written to Olympia Brown. It refers to Susan B. Anthony and Isabella Beecher Hooker. The writer describes the state approach to secure women's suffrage in Connecticut. The writer believes: "an act of the legislature can permit women to vote in town meetings- & in school districts also. He [Mr. Hooker] will make a little tract on this before we go- & next spring we will ask our suffrage legislature to decree that all women who pay taxes on five hundred dollars of real estate or personal property may vote- no one will dare vote against this."
This letter is signed.

Olympia Brown to John Hooker, April 8, 1874
Browne alludes to a letter that Hooker sent his wife. Isabella and Olympia are together at the time of Browne's response. The exact details of Hooker's letter are not described here. Browne writes: "I am astonished at what Mrs. Hooker has told me of Mr. Burton's course: to me it seems simply impertinent, but if it draws you nearer to Mrs. Hooker or arouses you to a new interest in reform I shall see in it the Providence of God leading you on through dreary deserts of disappointment & sorrow to the promised land of light & liberty and love."
This letter is signed.

Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 28, 1874
This letter is signed.

Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 9, 1876
Browne writes about her thoughts for how to have the most impact at the upcoming "exposition." This likely refers to the 1876 celebration of the country's centennial, held in Philadelphia.
This letter is signed. Included is a call to support the Citizen's Suffrage Association of Philadelphia.

Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 12, 1876
Browne writes in response to Hooker's ideas about the upcoming exposition. Browne writes: "it seems to me that in soliciting subscriptions it would be well to present the subject as a great educational work that we are intending to do in Phil. without dwelling especially on the fact that it is to be done by the national association. Few people outside a very narrow circle know the difference between the associations, all interested in suffrage must see the great opportunity which next summer affords to educate the people on this subject, our work in Phil can be nothing more than educational & in this all parties are alike, interested, there is no difference between the associations in ideas or methods while the work is purely educational, it is when we come to legislation &c that the difference comes in."
This letter is signed.

Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 15, 1876
Browne writes about recent activities of Connecticut suffragists, and her church.
This letter is signed.

Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 2, 1876
Browne writes about recent activities of Connecticut suffragists, and her church.
This letter is signed. There is a circular rip along the right margin which has obliterated some of the text.

Olympia Brown to Frances Ellen Burr, July 6, 1876
Browne resigns from executive committee of the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association, and from all associations as her tenure at a Bridgeport church has ended.
This letter is signed.

Folder 10Olympia Brown Correspondence, undated
Olympia Brown to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Browne writes of a recent sermon share gave with a women's suffrage theme. She expresses interest in having Anthony come to Bridgeport, and possibly her church, to give a lecture.
This letter is signed.

Unknown writer to "Dear Brownie"
The writer encourages Brownie not to take Stanton's sense of humor too seriously, referring to an unknown slight or disagreement between the women.
This letter is initialed with an "I".

Unknown writer to "Dear Brownie"
This letter is a one page fragment.

Box 3Suffrage Correspondence, 1869-1880
Folder 1Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, 1871-1872
Hannah Bradley married Lafayette Comstock in 1833. The couple lived in Connecticut, where Lafayette worked as a real estate broker. Hannah served on the executive committee of the state suffrage association, and as secretary of the New Haven association. As described in Ed. Ann Gordon's Selected Letters of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, Volume III.

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 5, 1871
Comstock writes about a recent suffrage meeting in which Mrs. Brown, likely Olympia Brown, spoke. She also shares her views about Victoria Woodhull, and says: "I want to know her better. I am more & more interested in her. And sometimes wonder why I am so strongly attracted towards her. It is a mystery to me, far from the views I have always entertained on those points she is so radical on I should have supposed I should have been one who would have joined the hue & cry against her Thank God I am not- I somehow seem impressed with the belief that she is right, and that we shall some day see the truth in her as it is."
title: Journal and Courier

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 14, 1871
Comstock comments on recent events: "How much I do thank Mrs Stanton for saying such brave words for Mrs Woodhull. I want to know ever so much more about her."
This letter is signed.

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 19, 1871
Cubebs, which is mentioned in this letter, consist of the dried unripe fruit of the plant Cubeba officinalis, which is cultivated in Java. Cubeb is listed in the Compendium as a Diuretic that is also slightly purgative. It can be used in the treatment of "gonorrhoea, gleets, fluor albus, urinary irritations, and gravel."
Comstock expresses her remorse at Hooker's ill health. She advises: "I have been a great sufferer myself at different time from the same trouble & know just how bad it make you feel. Let me mention two simple remedies, that are said to be good. I have used them freely for years. Crab apple jelly, & cubebs, use the former freely with your meals, the latter always by you & taken several in the course of the day-" Comstock goes on to report about a recent suffrage meeting held. She explains: "your letter proved a perfect God send to us. I read parts of it, and it would have done your soul good to see the interest manifested, all here ready for work, and said just as soon as they had the petitions they would go to work, men & women talked freely- and for the first time in my life I spoke out loud in meeting. My husband was Chairman & I sat beside him & together we performed wonders. I spoke of the call for the national convention at Washington, and they asked me to read it, which I accordingly did... It was like the Bugle blast to arms of the old Scottish Chiefs in the days of Bruce & Wallace."
This letter is signed.

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 30, 1872
This letter is signed.

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 27, 1872
This letter is signed.

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 7, 1872
Comstock expresses her views on the developments in the Tilton-Beecher scandal: "I feel much for your brother, but if these charges are true & he attempts to escape under Mrs. Woodhull's skirts all the more dreadful will his fall be in the end. Have you anything to say to ^me^ about it, any advise [sic] to give or any light and I would add any work. I am ready for work on this great social question & care but little what is said if I may only see & do my duty. As it was in the day of Adam, the woman who had done the wrong, so now in this last day the woman must bear the blame.
This letter is signed.

Folder 2Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, undated, 1871-1877
Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 6, 1874
Comstock shares with Hooker the question that her suffrage organization will be discussing the following week: "Are the existing differences in compensation for male & female labor justifiable?"
This letter is signed.

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 17, 1874
This letter is signed.

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 6, 1875
This letter is signed.

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 31, 1877
This letter is initialed.

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 2, 1877
Comstock shares with Hooker her thoughts about Spiritualism. She writes: I like to obtain true knowledge on the subject of Spiritualism & to a certain extent am a believer in its doctrines, but much in the dark. The modern theory of the Spirit-World is not to me attractive. I prefer the Earth with its earthly work which is real and [illegible] upon me. The mistakes and uncertainties of the Spirit-world are at variance with all my preconceived ideas of its perfect knowledge & stability, if God should grant me more perfect spirit knowledge, I might become fascinated with it, but as yet behind the veil which I know to be thin there rises up a stern awful reality which I draw back from facing. God grant that when my time comes I may boldly enter and find rest."
This letter is signed.

Hannah Comstock to Unknown, May 28, 18[7?]
Comstock writes from Kobe, Japan about a mission she is participating in. Many of the members of her group have returned to the United States due to illness.
This letter is signed.

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 21, 18[7?]
Comstock writes about the stroke her brother has suffered that has left him without the ability to speak and paralyzed.
This letter is signed.

Hannah Comstock to Isabella Beecher Hooker
This letter is signed, and was in an envelope postmarked January 11.

Folder 3Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 31, 18[--]
Davis responds to a decision whether to change the name of the suffrage newspaper The Revolution to a name more attractive to more potential supporters. She suggests that the suffrage movement should have focused on an equal rights campaign from the beginning, which would have appealed to more people.
This letter is signed, and dated Sunday, January 31st.

Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker
This letter is initialed.

Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 7, 18[--]
Davis writes in response to a circular that Hooker wrote and sent her. She offers feedback to strengthen the call, and asks Hooker to clarify decisions she made about which suffrage leaders to include in the call, and how that might impact the audiences' expectations.
This letter is signed, and dated April 7th.

Folder 4Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Davis writes am angrily worded letter related to suggestions Hooker has made about speaking salaries, and office holders. She writes: "My judgment, and feelings are never warped by what I hear. I must see and know for myself to judge. I do not mean to judge you harshly but I cannot feel that you have worked unselfishly and am sorry oh so sorry. You came into the work after it is comparatively popular you have as yet suffered nothing, but you have caused pain to some of us, and I may as well tell you as to carry it longer in my heart."
This letter is initialed.

Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 13, 18[--]
Davis writes that she misses Hooker and hopes she can come to the upcoming convention.
This letter is signed, and dated October 13th.

Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Davis alludes to the growing divide between suffrage leaders and Lucy Stone. She concludes her letter: "I wonder Mrs. L is not crazy, attacked and criticized publically (all very right that) but [illegible]ful that she has enemies secretly working against her her private moral character maligned her every utterance watched and misconstrued..."
This letter is signed.

Paulina Wright Davis to Isabella Beecher Hooker
This letter is initialed.

John Neal to Paulina Wright Davis, October 28, 1869
Neal writes to Davis about a meeting he recently had with Lucy Stone. He advises Davis to avoid debate about the 15th amendment in favor of remaining focused on the cause of women's suffrage. Davis wrote a note on the bottom of the verso: "I do not think we will promise not to use the 15th amendment if we think it will stir an audience more than anything else. Mrs. S. [Stone?] address has published in full several times of course she does not wish to use that."
This letter is signed.

Folder 5Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 4, 1870-June 28, 1871
Hanaford was a minister at a Universalist Church in New Haven. She served on the executive committee for the American suffrage association in 1870, and later in the National association in the 1880s. As described in Ed. Ann Gordon's Selected Letters of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, Volume III.

Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 4, 1870
Hanaford asks Hooker if she can speak before the Connecticut legislature. Hanaford has asked Olympia Brown, but she may be unable to come, and Hanaford writes that she feels "incompetent" and would rather not speak herself.
This letter is signed. A calling card is included.

Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 22, 1870
Hanaford writes that she is sorry Hooker is ill and unable to make the upcoming convention: "women of your noble spirit deserve health. May God restore it to you!"
This letter is signed.

Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 25, 1871
A Pharisee is a member of an ancient Jewish sect, distinguished by strict observance of the traditional and written law, and commonly held to have pretensions to superior sanctity.
Hanaford writes that she is resigning her position on the executive committee. She explains: "With Miss Brown I do not care to converse at present upon Suffrage matters, as her last remarks ^to me^ in regard to some points did not meet my approbation, and I prefer to be called a Pharisee rather than a free-lover. I did not hear Lucy Stone's 'red-herring' story, to which you refer, but I am a member of the Americans Society- helped to form it at Cleveland- and I presume that my sympathies are with her in reference to 'ride-issues.'"
This letter is signed.

Reverend Phoebe Hanaford to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 28, 1871
This letter is signed.

Folder 6Isabella Beecher Hooker: suffrage correspondence, 1872-1878
Isabella Beecher Hooker to Ned Hooker, March 16, 1872
Hooker describes two recent speaking engagements, the first in Bridgeport, which was her first political talk.
This letter is signed.

Isabella Beecher Hooker to William Wallace Eaton, May 23, 1873
Eaton was a Member of the House of Representatives for Connecticut.
Hooker asks for Eaton's support in the campaign for women's suffrage. She expresses frustration that women are taxed, but cannot vote. She reports: "I have heard that there is a black woman in N.[ew] Haven worth $20,000 who to her utter astonishment was called upon for her taxes the moment the 15th Amend to the Nat. Const. was ratified by 'the people' although only black men were considered to have been made voters by that act."

Isabella Beecher Hooker to Ellen Clark Sargent, March 13, 1878
Ellen Clark Sargent lived in Washington, D.C. and frequently hosted Hooker and others as they visited the city to make their appeal to Congress. As described in Ed. Ann Gordon's Selected Letters of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, Volume III.
This letter is signed. Included with it are biographical notes on small cards about an unknown person. The envelope refers to these notes as “Marchale Notes.” A separate card with names and addresses of Washington D. C. contacts.

Fragmentary draft letter about Isabella Beecher Hooker's visit to Niagara Falls
Folder 7Esther Jewell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 2, 1874-April 28, 1878
Esther Jewell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 2, 1874
Jewell describes the details of her upcoming travels to Europe, where she hopes to meet up with Hooker. Jewell also shares her thoughts about a case in Glastonbury: "I have watched the Glastonbury case very carefully, and although I do not think anything can ever be gained by resisting a law, still they have undoubtedly done something for the cause by calling direct attention to the injustice of the law, and a great deal is accomplished when people can be brought to think seriously upon a subject. I think you & Susan have done nobly: and you certainly deserve a rest after so busy a winter."
This letter is signed. Enclosed is a card for the Congress of Women, October 14, 1873.

Esther Jewell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 25, 1878
Jewell describes her feelings about Spiritualism: I am so glad you saw Mrs. R. and could have a sitting with her. She is the best and most reliable clairvoyant I have ever seen or known. She is truly honest, and greatly respected by everyone here and elsewhere that she is known. I always feel drawn to her as you say. I have known her four years and have often had sittings with her and received much comfort through her mediumship, and whatever Whitefeather says is reliable. I act on her advice, and find it always right, she has always told me of the changes we were to make some months before they took place. She gives me such sweet communications from my dear little Lucy as you say I have not been able to keep from tears. I seemed to feel her presence so near as if it were her lips that spoke, and not through another, when I get the opportunity I go to see Mrs. R. and have a little chat as she is the only Spiritualist I know here, and it does my heart good. I am not surprised that Whitefeather should give your name and speak of me. She so often gives such good tests to me and to others. I know it is not mind reading as she speaks of things I never knew before, and of things to come. I consider Mrs. R. a dear friend to have, and one that will have a beautiful crown in the next life for her love and faithfullness to others here. I am glad she thinks your brother a good medium. I do hope he will be brought to see that it is best to show his light here for who? could carry such an influence, such a mighty power with the people as he could. I read his sermons often, and see little by little he is bringing out the Spiritual truth. I hope yet he will come out boldly, and do what no other man in the world at this time can, and what a rich blessing he would get in the next."
This letter is signed.

Esther Jewell to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 19, 1874
Postcard

Folder 8Caroline M. Severance Correspondence, August 16, 1869-October 19, 1869
Caroline M. Severance to Paulina Wright Davis, August 16, 1869
Severance apologizes for not being able to go to the upcoming Newport convention, because it conflicts with another convention. She goes on to describe the difficulties and possible negatives of having so many suffrage organizations- state-wide and nationals.
This letter is initialed. Enclosed is a card for the Congress of Women, October 14, 1873.

Caroline M. Severance to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 19, 1869
This letter is signed.

Folder 9Lucy Stone Correspondence, August 4, 1869-May 18, 1872
Lucy Stone to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 4, 1869
Stone shares her opinions about slow progress with gaining supporters for women's right to vote, and argues in favor of working against Horace Greeley, who has long opposed their campaign.
title: The Woman's Journal

Lucy Stone to Isabella Beecher Hooker, May 18, 1872
This letter is signed.

Folder 10Suffrage Correspondence, A-H, ca. 1874-1880
J. H. Ailman to Isabella Beecher Hooker, July 23, 1879 [Chas] Atwater to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 7, 1878 John Barber to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 7, 1874
Barber wants to verify that Hooker would be present at a suffrage meeting. He also wants to know if Joseph Hawley is in favor of suffrage. Barber knows him as strong anti-slavery man, but Mrs. Comstock thinks he is opposed to woman suffrage, and if so, he must be defeated at all hazards.

Lucy L. Barber to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 6, 1880
This is a copy of a letter Barber sent elsewhere (recipient unknown) regarding the right of women to the vote.

Lillie Devereux Blake to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 14, 1880
The letter was written on the letterhead of the New York City Suffrage Society. Blake hopes Hooker will be at the next meeting, and that she receives at her home on Friday evenings, and would very much like to see her and any friends Hooker wants to bring.

William F. Channing to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 10, 1880
Found in The Revolution envelope with the calling card of Ruth C. Denison. He writes that the “woman suffrage movement in New England is in a decadent condition generally...The Boston (American) Society is without life or influence. All the work of any importance is being done by the National Society."

Miriam Cole to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 27, [18--]
The letter states that Cole she must decline Hooker’s invitation to speak at the Washington convention. She also speaks against the union of the two societies (likely the NWSA and the AWSA), and states that Hooker “stands aloof from the contending centers.”

[W.M.C.] to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 14, 1874
The writer speaks about the most recent meeting and says Hooker “should include New Haven in her course of lectures,” and believes that Hooker would do very well there. The writer also suggests New Hampshire as a place for the convention since” so many wanted to hear Miss Anthony...those who heard her liked her so much and would gladly hear her again.”

Esther Prader Hunt to Unknown, October 19, [18--]
The letter was written while at the Sublime Payostral [sic] Lodge of the Plienes. The statement details how suffrage would benefit women and also suggests that certain astrological signs may be more advantageous for their work than others.

Folder 11Suffrage Correspondence, G, 1871-1879
S. Helen Gale to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 1, 1879
Gale writes that the interview with S. L. Hall was obtained.

Sarah E. Fuller to Alfred Burr and Frank H. Burr, April 2, 1877
Alfred Burr and Frank H. Burr were editors of the Hartford Times. In this letter Fuller writes: “Resolved that we tender our hearty congratulations to the married women of Connecticut, on the recent passage of the bill introduced by Hon. George Hubbard, equalizing the property conditions of the sexes, and enabling the women to earn and hold the sacred home.” This letter refers to the Connecticut Married Women’s Act of 1877.

Sarah E. Fuller to Honorable George Hubbard, April 19, 1877
The enclosure was typed on Sorosis Society letterhead. She asks for a copy of the bill which recently passed the Connecticut legislature-the Connecticut Married Women’s Act of 1877. Enclosed is a Sorosis Society circular about higher education for women.

Matilda Joslyn Gage to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 7, 1871
In this letter Gage expresses anger that she was not invited to the 1871 convention in Washington D.C., despite her involvement before Paulina Wright Davis became involved.

Matilda Joslyn Gage to Isabella Beecher Hooker, January 14, 1871
In this signed letter, Gage writes that she will attend the upcoming convention, at Davis's urging, but that she is still hurt by Mr. Hooker's actions regarding a Hartford convention.

Folder 12Suffrage Correspondence, J-L,undated, 1869, 1879, 1880
Elizabeth B. Johnston to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 8, 1880
Letter is on The Aberdeen hotel's letterhead. She includes newspaper clippings regarding President Grant.

Sarah H. Leggett to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 21, 1879
Leggett owned a boarding house where Hooker stayed, called Clinton Plan.

Sarah H. Leggett to Isabella Beecher Hooker, August 27-September 9 Sarah H. Leggett to Isabella Beecher Hooker Mary A. Livermore, October 18, 1869
Livermore writes from Chicago and is on her way to Boston. From there she will travel to Hartford to attend Hooker's upcoming convention.

Folder 13Suffrage Correspondence, M-V, undated, ca. 1870-1880
Loring Moody to Isabella Beecher Hooker, September 28, 1880
In this signed letter Moody discusses the current status of women.

R. D. Mussey to Isabella Beecher Hooker, December 28, 1870
In this signed letter Mussey offers to speak at the convention to “state my reasons for urging this Reform” of women's enfranchisement. Mussey suggeststhat he knew Hooker as a young boy.

Colonel Andrew J. Rogers to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 26, 1880
In this signed letter, written on Cosmo-American Colonization letterhead, Rogers introduces himself to Hooker and includes a letter of introduction for himself and Augusta Smith, from Mrs. A. D. Smith of New York. He hopes Hooker will assist him in some Christian political work.

Anne D. Smith to Isabella Beecher Hooker, March 26, 1880
Originally housed in the same envelope with the letter written by Colonel Andrew J. Rogers to Hooker.

Ellen Buer to Isabella Beecher Hooker, April 21, 1879
In this signed letter, Buer shares the latest gossip about Julia Smith’s recent marriage at an older age.

Kate Trimble to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 25, 1878
Letter written in Covington, Kentucky. In this signed letter Trimble asks to receive more suffrage petitions and mentions that petitioning is going well and that she is “having these petitions signed largely by the most influential men and women in the state.”

Julia E. Smith to Isabella Beecher Hooker
Note by Smith presenting Hooker with a gift book.

Lita Barney Sayles to Isabella Beecher Hooker, October 7, [18--]
This signed letter was written on the verso of a tri-fold leaflet entitled “Summary of topicstreated in papers read at the annual public sessions.” The presidents were listed as: Mrs. Mary A. Livermore, Professor Maria Mitchell, and Mrs. Julia Ward Howe. The letter by Sayles discusses who to place as vice-president of the Connecticut suffragists at the Woman’s Congress. She talks about bringing three women together in a state congress for the advancement of women, since she feels smaller groups may work better. She asks Hooker for a friend’s name to put forward as the vice president of the Connecticut suffragists at the Woman’s Congress.

Alice Underwood to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 6, 1879
Underwood expresses her hope that Hooker will visit Washington in the winter as it is the long season of Congress. She wonders if: “the suffrage movement will be agitated as two years ago –Though I fear it is folly to expect any action that requires liberality from the body of men now representing the country.”

J. H. Vail to Isabella Beecher Hooker, February 12, 1880
This signed letter was written on the Winsted Herald, which was published in Connecticut. Vail discusses a submitted suffrage article.

J. H. Vail to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 30, 1880 S. A. Vibbert to Isabella Beecher Hooker, June 14, [18--]
In this signed letter, Vibbert asks Hooker to speak at a meeting on July 4, 5, and 6 in Princeton, Massachusetts.

William A. Williams to Isabella Beecher Hooker, November 27, 1878
Williams introduces himself and asks for a job working for the suffrage cause.

Unknown to [Isabella Beecher Hooker]
The letter is undated and unsigned, presumably to Hooker, which mentions Stanton and Anthony.

Box 4Suffrage Petitions, Appeals, and Resolutions, ca. 1867
Folder 1Isabella Beecher Hooker Correspondence, and proposals, 1871, 1878
Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to Representative Patrick Ford-Miller, February 15, 1878
There are two copies of this letter, in which Hooker proposes a new political party, called the Equal Rights Party of the United States.

Copies of letter related to Victoria Woodhull, 1871 June, 1871. July 3, 1871. June 26, 1871. May 28, 1871. June, 1871. July 3, 1871. June 26, 1871. May 28, 1871.
Included are Hooker's longhand copy of six letters she received with regard to Victoria Woodhull in the spring of 1871. The first letter is described as from "a gentleman in N.[ew] York, of great intelligence and until lately a stranger to Mrs. H," dated June, 1871. The second is a copy of letter sent by Edward M. Davis, the son-in-law of Lucretia Mott. The third letter is from Lucretia Mott, dated July 3, 1871. The fourth is from Samuel Bowles, dated June 26, 1871. The fifth is from Richard Mott "of Toledo to a friend." The final letter is from Martha Coffin Wright, dated May 28, 1871. The letters appear to praise Hooker's support of Woodhull's "free love" philosophy, while expressing concern about the public's perception of that issue, and its impact on the women's rights movement.
This item is bi-folium.

Draft letter to New York Press
In this letter Hooker gratefully acknowledging the press for their accurate reporting and requests that the papers that covered the convention publish resolutions that were offered by the committee as the platform of the convention, which were read and adopted by the convention in an almost unanimous vote. Hooker shares: "The adoption of the last vote was followed by hearty cheers."
Draft manuscript written on National Woman Suffrage and Educational Committee letterhead.

Draft letter to Representative Longridge
In this letter Hooker thanks him for his support of woman’s suffrage and for authoring the House Judiciary Committee’s Minority Report on the Woodhull Memorial.
Draft manuscript written on National Woman Suffrage and Educational Committee letterhead.
Separated Materials Please refer to the library's catalog for further information about this pamphlet.

Draft letter regarding motherhood
In this letter Hooker discusses her willingness to work at a convention: “Can I do anything to help the convention on the 22? If so you may command me on that day as no other for on that day fifty-six years ago my precious mother gave me honored birth, consecrated me to God and my kind in a very special way as she had told me many times…”

Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to Elizabeth Shenck, April 27, 1871
In this letter Hooker presents credentials and travel arrangements for the National Woman Suffrage Association California chapter’s representative, Laura de Force Gordon to attend the 1871 National Woman Suffrage Convention.
This letter is signed.

Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to the National Suffrage and Educational Committee, on behalf of Dr. Laura J. Ross Wolcott, and Mrs. M. J. Cadwallader, May 10, 1871
In this letter Hooker asks for support for the National Suffrage Convention from the Wisconsin Woman Suffrage Association Board of Directors to the Suffrage Convention,
This letter is signed.

Letter from Isabella Beecher Hooker to Women's Franchise Club of Hammonton, New Jersey, May 2, 1871
In this letter Hooker presents the credentials of Marie Howland for the 1871 National Woman Suffrage Convention.
This letter is signed.

Folder 2Notes, Suffrage Petitions, Appeals, and Resolutions: written by Isabella Beecher Hooker, undated, 1878
Suffrage statement
The statement reads "We the undersigned also decide to hear Mrs. Hooker in behalf of the women citizens of the United States and if possible will attend the above hearing before the Comm.[ittee] on Privileges and Elections on the 22nd of Feb." The names of those who signed the statement appear on the verso.

Memo regarding information for Mr. [Hadleigh?]
Included in this memo are four notes. The first begins: “Invite Senators to attend the hearing today, & ask how many wish seats provided for them.” The second begins: “Provide phonographic reporter best quality.” The third reads: “Direct chairs in the comm[ittee] room very early Friday morning if possible. Little taken out-” The fourth reads: “George E. Bullock Clerk of Comm[ittee] on Privileges and Elections – formerly clerk to Mr. Morton. Ask him to take out table and arrange chairs lengthwise early Friday morning. Must begin at 10.30 punctually –." The final note reads: “Phonographic Reporter.”

List of Senators
This item is a list of senators of interest, a meeting date and place, and the name of the Senate’s Clerk.
These notes were written on United States Senate Chamber letterhead.

Appeal from the Executive Committee
This is a draft manuscript of a document asking women to send letters to the Executive Committee, and for the Executive Committee to prepare a report for the second Congress summarizing "the thought and feelings of the letters."

Organizing for convention notes
This item includes notes about an upcoming convention and refers to the Freedman's Relief Association. On the verso of this page are notes regarding protest against railroad certificates and that the question is “more land swaps in 1850."

Transcription of editorial New York Times, ca. February 8, 1871 February 8, 1871 February 8, 1871
This item is a longhand transcription of an February 8, 1871 editorial from the New York Times about Anna Ella Carroll’s contributions to the Union cause during the Civil War by planning the Tennessee campaign. Hooker transcribes: “When a woman thus shows the ability to plan battles and arm them, it is difficult to deny her the trifling privilege of voting.”

Guidance for suffrage committees, ca. 1867 ca. 1867
The reference to Kansas on the third note suggests that Hooker may have written these notes in ca. 1867 , near the time of the Kansas campaign for women's suffrage.
This item is a series of three notes. The longest note, which covered all of the recto and 1/8 of the version is a draft document that provides guidance for local suffrage committees for contacting and arguing for suffrage before their Congressmen. The second note, is a draft letter to suffrage committee heads asking them to send a prospectus mentioned in the text (the prospectus is not included in this collection) to their Senators and Representatives in Congress as the suffrage supporters lack one vote in the House Judiciary Committee and two in the Senate Committee on Privileges and Elections. The last note states: "Senator Ingalls says he doubts where there is a woman in Kansas who wishes to vote."

Envelope with petition for woman suffrage, 1877-1878
The writing on the envelope reads: “Petitions for the 16tth Amendment Dec. 1877 During the Monday eve meetings of 1877 I secured a few names to petitions as opportunity offered, but made no general canvass. Going to Washington to attend convention Jany 8 1878, I proposed on my return to bring back word to these meetings as would instigate through petition work and throughout the state & so I did not present these petitions to Congress at all because my stay at Wash. was three months instead of ten days. After our meeting before the legislature this winter (Feby. 1879) I intend to forward these sheets to Senator Eaton and such other testimony from Connecticut as may be furnished.”

Petition for woman suffrage to the Senate and House Representative in Congress assembled, 1876-1878
There are three copies of this petitions, with signatures.

Folder 3Suffrage Petitions, Appeals, and Resolutions, undated, 1878
Benjamin Butler resolution
Manuscript of Butler’s second resolution before the House Judiciary Committee inviting the committee to hear Isabella Beecher Hooker speak. Included here are two copies in different hands.

Mrs. M. L. Davison receipt, February 19, 1878
The receipt written on the verso is for "$12.50 on account from Mrs. Hooker. Mrs. M. L. Davison.”
This receipt was written on United States Senate Post Office letterhead.

Appeal for a 16th Amendment, November 10, 1876
There are two copies of this petition.

National Woman Suffrage Association petition, 1877
There are 25 copies of this petition, including one with Isabella Beecher Hooker's and John Hooker's signatures. Most of the petitions include signatures.

Declaration and pledge of the women of the United State concerning their right to and their use of the elective franchise
There are 18 copies of this declaration, originally housed in an envelope.

Folder 4Printed Materials, A-C, ca. 1870-1888
The 16th amendment- Senator Ingalls in "The Forum", January 1888
3 copies. Pamphlet.

Appeal to the women citizens of the United States, 1879
On the verso of this sheet is: "Constitution of the National Woman Suffrage Association: Officers of the National Women Suffrage Association for 1879"
5 copies.

Arguments before the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives by a committee of the sixteenth annual Washington convention of the National Woman Suffrage Association in favor of a 16 Amendment to the Constitution, 1888
Pamphlet.

The Executive Committee of the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association present the following statement, and earnestly invite the co-operation of all whom this circular may reach, January 1870
Folio sheet folded to make 2 pages. Circular.

Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association meeting announcement Constitution of the Citizen's Suffrage Association
Text of the Citizen’s Suffrage Association constitution in 7 articles.
1 leaf printed on one side only. Circular.

The custom and guardianship of children, September 1884
An appeal written by Mrs. Wolstenholme Elmy, of Congleton, for interested parties to submit petitions to the House of Lords in support of the Infants Bill. Marginalia in an unknown hand at top of first page.
Leaflet.

Folder 51876 Centennial Exhibition
"The new century for woman"
Written by Sarah Catherine Fraley Hallowell, this provides a table of contents for the Exposition Volume of the New Century for Woman.

Radical club of Philadelphia
The smaller of the two leaflets, describes a resolution adopted by The Radical Club barring the use of demeaning cross-examination of female witnesses during a trial. The larger of the two leaflets conveys two resolution adopted by the Radical Club. The first is one that calls for the women journalists covering the Centennial Exposition to be properly recognized and allowed to practice journalism. The second resolution suggests that women should darken their dwellings for New Year celebrations in opposition to “the general illumination called for by the press” as a symbol of “the oppression and injustice of which they still remain victims”.
A pair of small leaflets. One is a single leaf of 2½” x 4¾” pink paper printed on one side only nested in another single leaf of 2½” x 7¾” pink paper also printed on one side only.

Memorial Hall International Exhibition, badge United States Centennial Commission International Exhibition, 1876: official catalog Authorized visitor's guide to the Centennial Exhibition and Philadelphia 1876
The Women's Pavilion was described on page 21, under "Miscellaneous Buildings."

Paper envelope
The envelope has the hand written words "Centennial 1876."

Folder 6Printed materials, D-F, ca. 1870-1883
To the editor of the American Traveler
Written by James A. Throop and Alfred Burnett, the men write regarding the editor’s article about Victoria Woodhull as a candidate for President of the United States.

"Dear Sir"
Written by the Ladies' Suffrage Committee, represented by Kate Palmer Stearns, President, write a compilation of letters to the “Law department, Office of the Counsel to the Corporation, New York.” The women wrote that they tried to register to vote and were summarily refused. They wrote back and stated reasons why they should be allowed to vote.

Endowment of a woman's professorship in Boston University's College of Liberal Arts
A pledge form for subscriptions to the professorship.

Elocution: the art of expression through the voice, as a culture study
Written by Miss Belle Bovee of New York City.

Four hundredth anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther, November 10, 1883
This pamphlet advertises the celebration held at the Hartford Theological Seminary.

"Dear friends: the Connecticut Woman Suffrage Association desire to circulate all over the state four tracts", December 26, 1870 "Dear Victoria", ca. 1879
This leaflet includes copies of three letters addressed to or pertaining to Victoria Woodhull.

Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776
This is a facsimile.

Folder 7Printed materials, G-O, ca. 1871-1886
General Nature No. 5, 1872
This circular was for an act for the "apportionment of representatives to Congress among the several states according to the ninth census in 1872."
Single leaf circular printed on both sides. 9 copies. Circular.

General Nature No. 10, 1871
This circular was for an act "to enforce the provisions of the 14th Amendment to the Constitution."

H. R. 771, 1871
This was a bill to enforce "equal rights and privileges of citizens of the United States."
Boldly inscribed on top margin: “Please Return to Mrs. Hooker.”

Plan of woman suffrage organizations and forms of petitions
On verso: Individual petitions to Congress, with example petition by Cornelia W. Browning: Relief from Political Disabilities. Both of these petitions were published by the National Woman Suffrage Association.
5 copies.

"Interesting correspondence", ca. 1875
Letter to the editor of The People. This contemporary reproduction of a letter to the editor of the 19th century periodical called The People was from an unnamed gentleman who received two letters from Abby and Julia Smith. These letters are introduced and are reproduced in full. In the first letter the sisters request the gentleman’s advice for the publication of Julia’s translation of the Bible in the hope that such publication would aid their cause by “have it known that a woman could do more than any man has ever done…”. The second letter from the Smith sisters is in response to the gentleman’s reply that they should use their money to further their cause of suffrage rather than publishing Julia’s work. In their response, they stated they were going to publish it anyway because men were put in charge of making laws that were discriminatory to women because men were thought to be superior in intellect; the sister intended to show by publishing Julia’s work that this was not true.
2 copies.

"Mr. E. Henry Lacombe", October 25, 1886 List of committees of the Senate of the United States for the first session of the forty-fifth Congress, October 15, 1877
This document includes hand-written corrections to the Standing Committee on Privileges and Elections.

Untitled speech [John Stuart Mill?]
5 copies.

Man, Mammon, Monopoly, May 29, [18--?]
This was a lecture that Lucinda B. Chandler delivered to the Chicago Labor Union.

Resolutions of the Margaret Fuller Society
Mary Dye, Secretary and Lucinda B. Chandler submitted the resolutions.

Proceedings of the first Margaret Fuller Society, 1800-1881
The purpose of the society was "the education of women in political economy and principles of government."

The national citizen and ballot-box, May 1, 1879
This leaflet includes an article by Susan B. Anthony about “Work done and to be done at the Forty-fifth Congress.” Communication about the initiative was directed to Syracuse, New York.

Annual convention of the National Woman Suffrage Association, convention call, 1870
The convention was held at Irving Hall, New York City.

20th Annual convention of the National Woman Suffrage Association, program
The convention was held at the Universalist Church in Washington, D.C.

The natural justice, civil equity and constitutional right of woman to the ballot, [1874]
This article was written by J. B. Wolff.
One copy has the inscription (likely by Hooker) “from Mrs. Jewell” in ink on the top margin.

"On to Victory"
This song was written by C. A. M. to the tune: "Hold the Fort." 4 stanzas with the chorus printed after each stanza.
Printed on one side only. Single leaf. 1 copy. Circular.

Ought women to learn the alphabet?
Abridged from the Atlantic Monthly. 4 pp. Inscribed at the top of the front page: “I. B. Hooker Please Return”. Leaflet.

Folder 8Printed materials, P-T, ca. 1879-1889
The Parliamentary franchise for women, May 24, 1884
Attributed to Elizabeth C. Wolstenholme Elmy.
2 copies. Leaflet

Plan for work, April 30, 1888
Attributed to the Executive Committee of the National Woman Suffrage Association, Fayetteville, New York.
2 copies.

Paper folder
On the envelope reads: "Philadelphia Assoctn. tracts- Gov. Campbell."

Should women vote?
Included are a compilation of quotes from famous activists such as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Theodore Tilton.
Inscribed at the top of the front page: “I. B. Hooker Please Return”. Leaflet.

Slayton’s Lyceum Bureau circular, 1879
This items includes a list of speakers for the upcoming season that include Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.
In original Slayton’s Lyceum Bureau printed envelope. Pamphlet.

S. R. 60, 1882
This is a joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution extending the right of suffrage to women.

S. R. 11, 1889
This is a joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution extending the right of suffrage to women.
4 copies.

Remarks by Mrs. Elizabeth L. Saxon of Louisiana Third annual report of the Working Girl's Vacation Society, 1886
Original printed wraps. 3 copies. Pamphlet. Includes subscription leaflet laid in.

A tract for the Poor and Laboring Men of the United States, on Democracy
Folder 9Review of the United States Supreme Court decision concerning suffrage, 1874
Printed by the Citizens Suffrage Association.
45 copies.

Folder 10Printed materials, V-W, ca. 1879-1889
Victoria Woodhull, September 26, 1879
Newspaper article, originally printed in Le Rappel.

Views of the minority, 1888
Senate report 523 Part 2: Mr. Hoar from the Committee on Privileges and Elections, submitted the following as the views of the minority.
6 copies with 4 copies annotated at the top in Hooker’s hand: “Please Return to Mrs. Hooker”.

Women's suffrage a political necessity, January 28, 1889
This leaflet is an abstract of an address by Reverend Olympia Brown before the House of Representatives.
18 copies.

Invitation to the political class of the Women's School of Politics and Law
Subject of the lectures: New York City’s government.

Women's suffrage in Wyoming
This item is a letter from N. L. Andrews in response to a letter from the Honorable J. W. Kingman originally published in the Washington Post.
2 copies.

Why the W.C.T.U (Women’s Christian Temperance Union) seeks the ballot
This broadside was written by Mary B. Willard.
3 copies.

Who were the voters in the early history of this country?, 1888
Originally published in the Chicago Law Times, written by Charles B. Waite.

Box 5Hooker Family Correspondence, 1878-1880
Folder 1Letters from Isabella Porter Beecher, 1879-1880
Isabella Porter Beecher was Isabella Beecher Hooker's sister-in-law.

April 14, 1879 May 29, 1879 October 16, 1879
This letter may have been sent on the occasion of Isabella and John Hooker's 50th wedding anniversary.

August 31, 1880
Folder 2Letters from Susie Beecher
Susie Beecher was Isabella Beecher Hooker's niece.
This folder includes three undated letters. All are fragments.

Folder 3Letters from Alice Hooker Day, undated, 1879-1880
Alice Hooker Day was Isabella Beecher Hooker's daughter.

January 3, 1879 April 1, 1879
Postcard

May 25, 1879
In this letter Day writes that she’s “written to the elected officers and requested their answers sent to you as a mere form…”

December 14, 1879 August 24, 1880
This letter was written to John Hooker.

September 14, 1880 April 24, [188?]
Postcard

May 5, 1880 August 27, 1880 November 13, 1880
Postcard

Folder 4Letters from Mary Hooker Burton, undated, November 11, 1876; January 5, 1879-March 17, 1879
Mary Hooker Burton was Isabella Beecher Hooker's daughter.

November 11, 1876
Enclosed with this letter is a ticket for the closing ceremonies for the International Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia.

January 5, 1879 January 8, 1879
Postcard

January 9, 1879
Postcard

January 17, 1879 January 29, 1879 March 5, 1879
In this letter Burton wishes Hooker good luck on a speech she will be giving.

March 17, 1879
Postcard

Folder 5Letters from Mary Hooker Burton, undated, April 10, 1879-July 28, 1879
Mary Hooker Burton was Isabella Beecher Hooker's daughter.

April 10, 1879
Enclosed with this letter are paper cut-outs from Mary’s daughter.

April 15, 1879 April 24, 1879 July 16, 1879 July 25, 1879 July 28, 1879
Folder 6Letters from Mary Hooker Burton, undated, September 26, 1879-February 27, 1880
Mary Hooker Burton was Isabella Beecher Hooker's daughter.

September 22, 1879 October 29, 1879 December 31, 1879 February 27, 1880
Enclosed with this letter is a cabinet card of a child.

February 14, [1880?]
Postcard

Undated letter Undated postcard
Folder 7Letters from Edward and Mattie R. Hooker, April 29, 1878; September 6, 1879-November 18, 1879
Edward Hooker was Isabella Beecher Hooker's son. His nickname was "Ned." Mattie was his wife.

April 29, 1878 September 24, 1879
This letter was written to John Hooker.

November 7, 1879 November 11, 1879 November 13, 1879
Postcard

November 15, 1879
Envelope only

November 18, 1879
Folder 8Letters from Edward and Mattie R. Hooker, November 19, 1879-December 8, 1879
Edward Hooker was Isabella Beecher Hooker's son. His nickname was "Ned." Mattie was his wife.

November 19, 1879 November 22, 1879
Enclosed is Edward Beecher Hooker MD's calling card.

November 25, 1879 November 26, 1879
Postcard

November 27, 1879 December 1, 1879 December 4, 1879
Postcard

December 8, 1879
Folder 9Letters from Edward and Mattie R. Hooker, December 9, 1879-April 23, 1880
Edward Hooker was Isabella Beecher Hooker's son. His nickname was "Ned." Mattie was his wife.

December 9, 1879 December 12, 1879 December 18, 1879
Postcard

December 21, 1879 December 26, 1879 February 26, 1880 February 28, 1880 April 23, 1880 December 21, 1880
Enclosed in a manuscript poem written by Edward Hooker.

Folder 10Letters from the Gillette family, 1874-1879 March 4, 1879-March 3, 1881. March 4, 1879-March 3, 1881.
Elizabeth Hooker Gillette was John Beecher Hooker's sister. Senator Francis Gillette was Hooker's brother-in-law. The Gillette's had two children, Lilly and Edward Hooker. Edward served in the U. S. House of Representatives from March 4, 1879-March 3, 1881.

Letter from Elizabeth Hooker Gillette, November 20, 1874
Enclosed is a letter from Lilly.

Letter from Lilly Gillette, December 10, 1874 Letter from Elizabeth Hooker Gillette, January 4, 1875
Francis wrote a letter on the second leaf.

Letter from Lilly Gillette, January 5, 1875 Letter from Edward Hooker Gillette, April 14, 1879
This letter was written on U.S. House of Representatives letterhead.

Box 6Hooker Family Correspondence, 1878-1880
Folder 1Letters from John Hooker, September 22, 1879-November 8, 1879
September 22, 1879 September 25, 1879 September 27, 1879 September 28, 1879 October 28, 1879
An undated postcard was enclosed with this letter.

November 6, 1879
Postcard

November 8, 1879
Folder 2Letters from John Hooker, November 13, 1879-December 24, 1879
November 13, 1879 November 16, 1879
Envelope only.

November 19, 1879 November 27, 1879
Envelope only.

December 5, 1879
Postcard

December 11, 1879 December 12, 1879 December 15, 1879
Two postcards

December 18, 1879
No envelope

December 20, 1879 December 24, 1879
Folder 3Letters from John Hooker, February 26, 1880-November 25, no year
February 26, 1880
2 letters: "before breakfast” and later in the day.

April 11, 1880 April 16, 1880
Postcard

April 20, 1880 November 27, no year
Partial undated letter marked “John Nov. 27 Sent to Charles Brace.”

January 28, no year February 30, no year November 25, no year
Empty envelope

Folder 4Letters from Hattie Hawley, undated, August 11, 1878-April 30, 1879
Hattie Hawley was the Hooker's cousin.

August 11, 1878 April 30, 1879
Includes letter from “Lilly W.”

Undated
Folder 5Letter from Dora [Beecher?], October 12, 1880
Dora was Hooker's niece.

Folder 6Letters from Commander Edward Hooker, March 31, 1878, December 24, 1879
Commander Edward Hooker was Hooker's brother-in-law.

Folder 7Personal Correspondence, B, 1879-1886
Tom Beatty, April 28, 1879 Tom Beatty, May 28, 1879 L. H. Brace, ca. December 2, 1880 L. H. Brace, ca. December 7, 1880
This letter was written on Children’s Aid Society letterhead.

[C. N. Borce?], December 2, 1886
This letter was written on Armoux Ritch & Woodford letterhead.

Susan Burnett, April 24, 1880 Frances Hodges Burnett, October 16, 1880 Frances Hodges Burnett, ca. October 23, 1880
Folder 8Personal Correspondence, C, 1874-1880
Emily W. Case, October 12, 1880 R. H. [Chitterden?], October 20, 1880
This letter relates to Spiritualism.

R. H. [Chitterden?], October 27, 1880 E. R. Collins, August 11, 1874
Collins was a friend during the Hookers' time in England.

M. S. Cowles, March 16, 1879
Folder 9Personal Correspondence, D-H, 1878-1880
H. P. Duclos, January 30, 1880
This letter was written on Hartford Life and Annuity Insurance Company letterhead.

Arnold Hiscant
This letter was torn across the top.

Julia Holmes, December 25, 1879
No envelope.

H. P. R. Holt, October 2, 1878 H. P. R. Holt, December 3, 1878 H. P. R. Holt, February 2, 1880 H. P. R. Holt “Mrs. Burnett”, July 27, 1880
This letter includes messages to Hooker.

Joseph Hull, October 5, 1878
This letter includes references to spiritualism.

Folder 10Personal Correspondence, K-P, 1878-1880
A. L. King, May 7, 1879 Mary Lippincott, January 12, 1880 William A. Lorenz, April 24, 1878 Mary Frances Neigley, January 14, 1879 Mary Frances Neigley, February 14, 1879 Mary Frances Neigley, April 19, 1879 L. A. Painter, May 2, 1880 Leila E. Patridge, January 8, 1880
Advertisements for classes in Shakespeare are included with this letter.

Hugh O. Penticost, January 6, 1879 E. P. Perkins, September 2, no year Mrs. Pope, January 27, 1880
This letter was written on Pope’s Sanitarium letterhead.

Folder 11Personal Correspondence, S-W, 1878-1880
M. D. Shindler, May 21, 1879
Postcard

Mary Stevens, July 21, no year
Calling card is enclosed.

S. L. Warner, October 29, 1880 C. N. Wayland
This letter is an invitation to see Gilbert and Sullivan’s H.M.S. Pinafore.

Mrs. Whitmore, October 27, no year James Wing, July 17, 1878
Folder 12Correspondence from Edwin M. Stanton, March 9, 1863
Serving as President Lincoln’s Secretary of War, this letter is a pass “to the Headquarters of the 141st New York. General Cowden’s Command together with carriage & driver and back” for Lt. Col. Beecher and Hooker.

Folder 13Correspondence from unknown persons
Box 7Ephemera
Folder 1Calling cards
Included in this folder are calling cards from: Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Barrows; Mrs. B. H. Bartol; Mrs. Andrew Bigelow; J. Hartwell Butler (U.S. Army); Mrs. Henry Cohen; Dr. William Fishbough; Julia J. Foster (New Year); Rachel G. H. Foster (New Year); Mrs. Joseph G. Jones; Mrs. C. M. Kahn; Mrs. Leila E. Patridge; Mr. and Mrs. Thaddeus C. Pound; Kate Stanton M. D.; Frederic Whitmore.

Folder 2Receipts from European trip, 1874-1875 August 10, 1874 September 4, 1874 September 5, 1874 September 12, 1874 no month 21, 1874 1874 July 29, 1874 July 30, 1875 August 6, 1875 August 7, 1875 August 10, 1874 September 4, 1874 September 5, 1874 September 12, 1874 no month 21, 1874 1874 July 29, 1874 July 30, 1875 August 6, 1875 August 7, 1875
Included in this folder are receipts from: Swears and Wells dated, August 10, 1874 ; Hope Brothers Wollen Drapers, Tailors and Outfitters, dated September 4, 1874 ; Civil Service Supply Association, Limited 7 receipts, dated September 5, 1874 ; S. Mart & Company, frutier, dated September 12, 1874 ; Hotel Saint-Petersbourg, Paris, 2 receipts, dated no month 21, 1874 ; VE. J. Magin, Guedin & Company, watches, dated 1874 ; W. Whiteley Department Store July 29, 1874, 5 receipts pinned together with porter’s receipt; W. Whiteley Department Store July 30, 1875, 1 receipt and 1 porter’s receipt; W. Whiteley Department Store August 6, 1875 ; John Battersby Ladies Boots and Shoes, dated August 7, 1875 ; Tice & Lynch Custom House Brokers (envelope with business cards); John Browning Optician (business card and envelope)..

Folder 3Ephemera
This folder includes: a business card from Stephens & Company, Manufacturers of U. S. Standard Boxwood and Ivory Rules. (Riverton, Connecticut). At the top in Hooker’s hand: “Suffrage man on [illegible] to New York. Wife also.” Also included is a pamphlet from the Fairy Stones of Virginia; and a leaflet from Miss Minnie Swayze, who was a lecturer and reader. There are also eleven invitation to the Hooker's daughter's wedding, as well as one invitation from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

Box 8Newspaper Clippings, 1866-1887
Where possible the author's name has been identified.

Folder 11866-1871
"Watch and Pray," April 1866
This article was written from South Norwalk, Connecticut by Reverend H. N. Dunning.
"To Daffadills," The Daily Courant, December 11, 1867
"Health: Boiled Rice", 1870
"The Courts: The XIV Amendment and the Civil Rights Bill Construed," Chicago Legal News, October 15, 1870
"Women Opposing Suffrage for the Sex", 1871
"Marriage and Divorce", January 1871
R.M. Hatfield, D.D.
[The year 1870 may safely be considered the grave of the woman sufrage movement…] Advance, January 12, 1871
"Woman Suffrage Again & Paulina W. Davis in Reply to Mrs. Ingersoll", January 16, 1871
A Woman & Paulina W. Davis
[The ladies who have managed the latest female suffrage effort in Washington…?] Courant, January 16, 1871
[Woman Suffrage: The woman's suffrage advocates have during the past week had a hearing before the judiciary committee] [Hartford Evening Post?], January 16, 1871
[We have to congratulate Mr. W. W. Eaton upon his progress] Courant, January 18, 1871
"Woman Suffrage: Editor of The Evening Post," Hartford Evening Post, January 18, 1871
'Woman Suffrage: In another column will be found a communication on the subject of "Woman Suffrage," from a prominent advocate,' Hartford Post, January 18, 1871
[Some woman suffragists of the Woodhull and Claflin stamp have been pushing] Advance, January 19, 1871
[Bartlett's Letter] The Independent, January 19, 1871
"Woman Suffrage in Washington", January 21, 1871
Isabella Beecher Hooker
[The Woodhull & Claflin's Weekly, which conspicuously advertises as follows: "The Cosmo-Political Party] Courant, January 24, 1871
"Special Reforms," Courant, January 24, 1871
[The question, how shall social evil be controlled] Courant, January 25, 1871
"The Woman Suffrage Convention," [Courant?], January 28, 1871
"Social Problems Based on Physical Grounds," Courant, February 2, 1871
[Woman Suffrage: Number V.] Courant, February 4, 1871
[No party of reformers ever carried so much weight as those who labor for woman suffrage] Courant, February 8, 1871
"Making Infamy Lawful," The Independent, February 9, 1871
Henry C. Bowen
[During the lull in home politics women are waiting an answer from statesmen] Courant, February 17, 1871
"The Voice of the Women: Addresses of Mrs. Woodhull and Mrs. Beecher Hooker," The Tribune, February 17, 1871
[Female Financing: Woodhull & Claflin in a "Corner"] [New York Herald?], February 22, 1871
[The eminent brokers, Victoria C. Woodhull and Tennie C. Claflin, have been beaten in a law suit] Courant, February 23, 1871
"Civil Rights of Women: Lecture Before the University Law School by William R. Martin—Freedom the Only Solution—English vs. American Theory and Practice of Law," Courant, March 1, 1871
"Law and Prostitution," [The Advance?], March 2, 1871
WM. W. Patton, D.D.
"A Funeral March," The Independent, March 2, 1871
H.H.
[That organ of a couple of sharp adventureres] Courant, March 4, 1871
"Woman's Rights" [Hartford Evening Post?], March 8, 1871
"Woman Suffrage: Number VI," The Hartford Courant, March 14, 1871
F.G.
"What They Are Doing," Independent, [August 17, 1871?]
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
"Women and Money" [Independent?] , August 24, 1871
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
"Woman's Suffrage Meeting", December 14, 1871
"Anthony's Oration: Views of Susan B. on Dr. Holland's Bill," San Francisco Chronicle, December 16, 1871
"The Reception to Susan B. Anthony: Enthusiasm of the Woman-Suffragists—Toasts and Responses," San Francisco Chronicle, December 16, 1871
Folder 21872
"The Suffragists: Woodhull, Stanton, Anthony, &c," National Republican, January 11, 1872
"The Ballot: Woman's Suffrage Convention: The Battle Renewed Before Congress," The Daily Morning Chronicle, January 11, 1872
Three copies
"Wanted---Our Rights: The Woman on the War-Path: Advance of the Hooker-Stanton Woodhull Wing of the Suffrage Army," The Daily Patriot , January 11, 1872
"The Suffragists: Second Day's Session," National Republican, January 12, 1872
"Woman: Second Day's Battle: Earnest and Eloquent Speeches," The Daily Morning Chronicle, January 12, 1872
2 copies
"Women on the War-Path," The Daily Patriot, January 12, 1872
2 copies
"The Suffragists: Third Day's Session," and "Woman Suffrage Question," National Republican, January 13, 1872
2 copies
"Woman Suffrage: Close of the Convention: Ground Gained---Brilliant Prospects," The Daily Morning Chronicle, January 13, 1872
"The Woman's Raid: How They Took the Capitol by Storm," The Daily Patriot, January 13, 1872
"The Woman's Suffrage Movement," Sunday Gazette, January 14, 1872
Folder 31874-1875
"The Story of the Boon: II," The Independent, December 10, 1874
H.H.
"Temperance: Serivces at the First M.E. Church Last Evening," Democrat and Chronicle, March 30, 1874
"The Praying Temperance Women", March 4, 1874
James G. Clark
"The Banquet," and "Victoria C. Woodull's Lecture," Daily Morning Herald, January 29, 1875
"Wellesley College for Women: A Palace of Learning in Eastern Massachusetts," Washington Chronicle, November 14, 1875
Henry H. Tilley, LL. B.
The Sabbath Question, In Its Relation to Mr. Beecher's Preaching at the Twin-Mountain House —, September 8, 1875
Two papers folded together
"Catholics and the Schools," The Chrisitan Union, September 8, 1875
"The Invisible Church," The Christian Union, September 8, 1875
Folder 41876-1879
"The Glastonbury Ladies Again", April 11, 1876
Julia and Abby Smith
"Two of Us at the Centennial: How the Visitors Are Impressed: A Visit to the Indian Quarters," Hartford Daily Times , June 12, 1876
"Boston Correspondence: Miss Dickinson", May 17, 1876
"Reminiscences of the Girlhood of Tennie C. Claflin," Woodhull & Claflin's Weekly, May 27, 1876
"Centennial Correspondence: Preparations for the Opening of the Exhibition" [Courant?], May 4, 1876
"They Want to Vote: And Be Like the Sterner Sex—The Men", 1877
"Gossip by Roberts," The Capital, 1878
Roberts
Originally housed in Envelope 4
G"Gossip by Roberts," The Capital, January 20, 1878
"The Centenial," and "Dangerous Coachmen" Kentucky Gazette , April 5, 1879
"Female Suffrage: The Women Desire to Exercise the Ballot in Louisiana," The Daily Picayune, May 8, 1879
American Social Science Association: General Meeting of 1879 —, September 1879
Folder 51880-1884
"The Women at St. James's Hall", June 5, 1880
"Woman Suffrage in Great Britain," The Woman's Journal, June 12, 1880
"France's National Fete: The Fall of the Bastile Commemorated", July 29, 1880
"Angelina Grimke Weld (Continued from Last Week)," The Woman's Journal, July 31, 1880
"What Makes Wade Hampton Squirm" [Tribune?], August 22, 1880
Charles Beecher
"Women Voters of New York State," The Woman's Journal, August 28, 1880
Two papers folded together.
"Thanksgiving Sermon by Dr. Lyman Beecher in 1819," The Winsted Herald, November 25, 1881
"Washington's Women: Equal before the Law with their Husbands and Fathers," The Woman's Journal, December 12, 1883
"Mrs. Mary L. Griffith: A Sketch of Her Life and Labors" The Alpha, June 1, 1884
"The Spiritual Rostrum", ca. November 2, 1884
This page describes spiritualism meetings and events from across the country, including Rochester, New York.
"Boston Correspondence: Dr. Holmes and Emerson," The Hartford Courant, December 20, 1884
"A Baptist Meeting House: No. XVII," The Christian Register, December 25, 1884
"Beecher and His Church," Hartford Times, December 26, 1884
Folder 61885
"Woman in the Brahmo Somaj," The Christian Register, January 22, 1885
Ednah Dean Cheney
"The Women Discussing: Their Convention at Washington: Religon Versus Women's Rights," The Hartford Daily Times, January 29, 1885
Both copies of this page are fragile.
"Theosophy of the Hindoos: Elucidation and Analysis of the Bhagvat Geeta: No. I," The Golden Rule: Boston, January 31, 1885
Prof. Alonzo Phelps
"Theosophy of the Hindoos: Elucidation and Analysis of the Bhagvat Geeta: No. II," The Golden Rule: Boston, February 14, 1885
Prof. Alonzo Phelps
"Theosophy of the Hindoos: Elucidation and Analysis of the Bhagvat Geeta: No. III," The Golden Rule: Boston, February 28, 1885
Prof. Alonzo Phelps
"Evolution and Mr. Beecher," The Index, July 30, 1885
"A Fragment of an Ancient Gospel" The Index, July 30, 1885
B. F. Underwood
"The Montanists: Their Beliefs and Practices," The Index, July 30, 1885
"Letter from France," The Woman's Journal, July 31, 1885
"The Burial of Gen Grant: Final Honors to the Dead Soldier," Springfield Weekly Republican, ca. August 8, 1885
"The Drama of the Yachts", August 14, 1885
"Annual Meeting: American Woman Suffrage Association," The Woman's Journal, August 22, 1885
"Our English Letter" The Woman's Journal, August 29, 1885
Rebecca Moore
"Literary Notices," The Woman's Journal, August 29, 1885
"Amanda Deyo at the Polls", August 29, 1885
Hamilton Wilcox
"Spirit Messages, Given Through the Mediumship of Miss M. T. Shelhamer," Banner of Light, September 5, 1885
"Propriety in Journalism," The Woman's Journal, September 5, 1885
Folder 71886-1887
"The English Worcester: Its Cathedral, Choir Festival, Porcelain, Gloves, and Sauce," Hartford Daily Courant, 1886
"The Larger Life," [The Occult Word?], January, Februrary 1886
"The Female Franchise: Another Attempt to Secure Equal Rights for Women," The National Republican, February 16, 1886
"A Woman's Record," Albany Sunday Press , April 25, 1886
"Women and Men: The Decline of the Tea Party," Harper's Bazar, May 22, 1886
"The Congress of Churches," The Hartford Courant, May 24, 1886
"Christian Beliefs: The Present Necessity for a Restatement," Hartford Daily Courant, 1886
"After the Defeat: Scenes in the Commons: Never the Like Before," Hartford Times, June 9, 1886
"Letters from the People: St. Paul and Obedience," The Hartford Courant, July 29, 1886
"Saratoga Alarmed," Saratoga Eagle, August 1886
The New York Herald, August 5, 1886
"Two Kings of Egypt: Ta-aken Who Fell in Battle and the Hand-some Seti," September 1886
"New York City: Held by the Enemy," [Connecticut Courant?], September 16, 1886
"Immigration and Emigration," The Springfield Republican, October 8, 1886
"Powderly to the Knights: Address to the Big Convention," The Hartford Courant, October 6, 1886
"Socialism Defined: By Two of Its Avowed Disciples: The Avelings and Liebknecht at Springfield," Springfield Weekly Republican, October 15, 1886
"The Bartholdi Statue: Oration at the Unveiling, October 28, 1886, by Channeey M. Depew," Hartford Daily Courant, October 29, 1886
"Equality Before the Law," The Woman's Tribune, March 1887
"The Model Policewoman: What We May Expect When Mrs. Hooker's Idea Is Carried Out," The World, April 10, 1887
Box 9Newspaper Clippings
Where possible the author's name has been identified.

Folder 1Envelopes of Newspaper Clippings
These clippings were previously housed in envelopes. This original order has been preserved.

"The Political Situation," The Christian Union , March 10, 1875
George S. Merriam
The National Republican, December 21, 1882
"Their Excellencies Butler and Waller on Woman Suffrage," Our Herald , January 20, 1883
Emily P. Collins
"A Day In Prison", January 28, 1883
Sarah M. Perkins
The Woman's Journal , March 24, 1883
"Autobiography of Frances D. Cage"
"Medieval Notions about Women"
"The decision of the special committee appointed by the trustees of Columbia college"
"A Superior Being," Hartford Daily Times
"The Press of the Nation! What They Think and Say of the Verdict," Our Herald
"Why Women Should Vote," Springfield Weekly Republican
"Mrs. Mettler's Funeral," The Hartford Daily, March 27, 1880
"The Hundred and Fifth Birthday," The Congregationalist, July 20, 1881
Judge Albion W. Tourgee
"Beecher on Spiritualism: Leave it to Scientists to Work Up," May 28, 1883
Miller's Psychometric Circular , May 1883
"Experiences with Mary M. Hardy: Chapter I."
John Wetherbee
Spiritism: The Gifts of Jesse Shepard: No. II.
Henry Kiddle
"Funeral Services of Mrs. M. J. Roberts"
Two copies
"David P. Smith & Dr. Smith's Funeral"
"Literary Notices"
"A Typical Policeman: A Terror to Evil-Doers: A Praise to Them That Do Well (For the New York Observer)"
"A Sharp Letter From Gladstone: He Corrects Some of John Bright's Statements"
"Unfortunate Ludwig of Bavaria," Springfield Weekly Republican
"Gossip by Roberts," The Capital , 1878
"Brave Belva's Bill: Mrs. Lockwood Gloats Over Her Success in the House"
"An Awful Temperance Lecture (Miss Grundy in New York Graphic)"
"Women With Voices (Miss Grundy in the Graphic)"
"The Voice of the Voiceless: Mrs. Dahlgren's Argument Against Woman Suffrage"
Madeleine Vinton Dahlgren
[Mrs. Isabella Beecher Hooker said that "the women intended to take possession of the Capitol…"]
[The last number of Woman's Words contains a portrait of Mrs. Sara Andrews]
Two copies
[Mrs. Isabella Beecher Hooker will, we fear, lose faith in the efficacy of prayer in legislative matters]
Mrs. Hooker's Receptions
[Mrs. Isabella Beecher Hooker has published a powerful little work entitles, "Womanhood"]
"Another Denial from Mrs. Dahlgren," [Evening Star?]
Madeleine Vinton Dahlgren
"Mrs. Hooker's Receptions"
[Mrs. Isabella Beecher Hooker has advanced as far as Capitol Hill]
[Speaking of Henry Ward Beecher recalls his meeting with his sister…?]
[How Mrs. Hooker startled the Ladies] New Britain
This clipping includes the following description: “At a recent caucus Isabella Beecher Hooker, Beecher-like, made a tremendous impression. She is a tall, slender, refined-looking woman, with pale blue eyes and grayish curls about her face. She dresses handsomely but a little peculiarly. I cannot get it out of my head that a magnificent tragic actress was lost to the world when Isabella Beecher didn’t take the stage.”
"The Woman Suffragists at the Capitol"
"Nibblings—No. 11: The Other Side of the Question (For Forney's Sunday Chronicle)"
"An Error Corrected: Mrs. Spencer to Mrs. Dahlgren," [Evening Star?]
Sara Andrews Spencer
[The Sixteenth Amendment Convention]
"Mrs. Hooker's Last Idea," The Post
Two copies
"The Praying Women: Their Meeting at the Capitol Yesterday—A Rather Unique Performance," The Post
Two copies
"Mrs Isabella Beecher Hooker"
Two copies
"Mrs. Isabella Beecher Hooker at the Capitol," [Star?]
"Dear friend... Yung Wing", ca. 1878
Two copies
[To calm apprehensions, we will state that Isabella Beecher Hooker's hearing…] [Union?], ca. February 25, 1878
"Mrs. Hooker and the Chinese"
Almira Lincoln Phelps
Two copies
"Hon. A. H. Stevens and the Woman Suffragists," [Star?]
"A Woman Suffrage Hearing," [The Hartford Courant?], ca. February 23, 1878
"Chat By the Way: Social, Local, and General Gossip"
[Mrs. Mary Clemmer, in the Independent of March 31] [The Post?]
"Mrs. Lockwood's Victory"
"Mrs. Hooker's Hit: She Tells the Senate Committee About Woman's Suffrage," [The Post]
"A Mild Rebuke: Mrs. Almira Lincoln Phelps to Mrs. Isabella Beecher Hooker," [The Post?]
Almira Lincoln Phelps
Two copies
"Scene at a Washington Table d'Hote," The Springfield Republican, March 22, 1878
[Samuel Bowles?]
Three of these
[Grace Greenwood writes from Washington to the New York Times] The New York Times, ca. May 18, 1878
Also included is an announcement for a Greenwood lecture to be held on April 3, 1878.
"Mrs. Isabella Beecher Hooker's Levees"
"Our Washington Letter: The Woman Suffrage Army at the Capital," The Hartford Times, January 12, 1878
Five copies
[Some enterprising chap in Washington telegraphs about the woman's convention]
Five copies
"They Won't Fight," The Post
Sara Andrews Spencer
[Gossip by Roberts (February 17)?]
"The Woman Suffrage Convention"
Folder 2Newspaper clippings, unknown date (1 of 2)
"Kentucky and Woman Suffrage"
Three copies
"Kindling Coal Fires," Hall's Journal of Health
"The Guest"
C. P. Cranch
"An Affecting Scene"
"The Stars (Susan Coolidge in the Congregationalist)"
Susan Coolidge
"Obituary of Mrs. Emeline Babcock Penfield"
"Ladies in Parliament"
"Whittier's Centennial Hymn," Hartford Daily Courant
"Anna Dickinson on Men's Rights"
"A New System of House-Keeping—Not Co-operative"
Helen E. Starrett
[The "Life and Letters" of lamented Hartford divine]
Horace Bushnell
"Hymn to the Stars"
W.B.O. Peabody
"A Correction: To the Editor of the Courant" [Courant?]
Catherine E. Beecher writes: "I am informed that my name has appeared in some of the public prints as an advoctae for woman suffrage. This is not true either of myself or of a large majority of my family and personal friends, most of whom would regard such a measure as an act of injustice and oppression, forcing conscientious women to assume the responsibilities of the civil state, when they can so imperfectly meet the many and more important duties of the family state, and the connected ministries of instruction and benevolence."
"Spirit of the New Faith" [Tribune?]
"The Woman Suffrage Movement"
VAN
"A Canadian Prison"
Sarah M. Perkins
"The Misery at Naples" From the French of Marc Monnier"
"Worthy of Imitation"
Dore's "Ancient Mariner"
"Susan B. Anthony: A Farewell Reception at the Grand Hotel Last Evening"
"Be Faithful" [The Sunday-School Times?]
Reverend James F. Holcomb
"Pulpit Readings," Hartford Daily Times
WM. J. Potter, jr.
"D. M. Bennett Sentenced: A Book May be Publicly Sold but Not Sent Through the United States Mails"
This clipping is fragile.
"Sixty-Two Years Ago: Shipwreck on the French Coast—Reminisces of Paris, Washington Irving, etc.," Hartford Daily Courant
E.A.G.
"The Religion of the Indian: Address by Co. Meacham"
"Woman Suffrage: The Twenty-fifth Anniversary—Address by Miss Anthony, Mrs. Stanton, and Others—Resolutions Submitted" [Times?], ca. 1871
"The Discovery of Modern Anesthesia —A Critique ," Hartford Daily Courant
H.P. Stearns, M. D.
"Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Her Mode of Living, Love of Sleep, Etc.," Hartford Daily Courant
"National Woman's Suffrage Convention: The Semi-Annual Session: Opening Proceedings To-Day" [Evening Star?]
Two copies
"Just Once."
"A Touching Incident"
"Woman Suffrage: Semi-Annual Session of the National Convention" [Evening Star?]
Four copies
"Helena Modjeska: Reminiscences of her Girlhood: A Romantic Career"
"The Centennial Loan Exhibition"
"Two Famous Beauties: Maria and Elizabeth Gunning"
"Madam Farrenc: A Paris telegram announces the death of Madam Jeanne Louise Farrenc"
"Beethoven's Nine Symphonies," The Christian Register
John S. Dwight
"The Silent Warrior of the West (For The Courant)"
Richard E. Burton
"William Pynchon: And his Heretical Book"
"Hawthorne and Margaret Fuller: The Interesting Controversy Kindled by an Indiscreet Publication"
"Dangers from the South"
"Spirit Messages, Given Through the Mediumship of Miss M. T. Shelhamer," Banner of Light
"Religious Matters: Events and Opinions"
Two copies
Folder 3Newspaper clippings, unknown date (2 of 2)
"The Old South Church: The Stirring Speech of Wendell Phillips"
"Threnody: Suggested by the Death of an Infant Daughter of Martin F. Tupper" [London Art Journal?]
R. T.
[An Interesting Case.—The New York Herald gives the following particulars]
"People's Progress Abroad"
"My Rest"
"The Woman's Congress"
"Vigilante!"
C. L. J.
"French Marriage Laws"
"The Co-operative Movement in England"
Emily Blackwell, M.D.
Two page article
"Woman Suffrage to be Enforced (To the Editor of the Chronicle)," The Chronicle
William F. Channing
"An Experiment for Women" [Courant?]
"Teach Plainly," Sunday-School Times
R. G. Pardee
"Portrait of Bishop Butler"
"Lawyers on Law Reform" [Courant?]
"Boston Symposia: Large Gathering of Collegiate Alumnae"
"Conjugal Unions: When Legal and When Not"
[One of the passengers on the Etruria was Mr. Andrew Carnegie]
"The Hour of Praise"
"The Indian Policy: Sheridan Asked to Substantiate His Charges"
"John Ruskin: His Opinions of Museums" [Tribune?]
G. W. S.
"One Warning More: Written for distribution on a race-course, 1824"
James Montgomery
"What M. Bartholdi Says of It. (Paris Special to the World)"
[In the fifth chapter of Genesis in our Bibles, is a chronology of the world]
"Peter and the Angel (From the Univercoelum)," New York Tribune
Thomas L. Harris
[A Correspondent writes: "Are you not giving too much space to the discussion of Mr. Abbot's metaphysical and theological ideas"]
"Christ Betrayed" [New York Tribune?]
Anne C. Lynch
"Woman Suffrage in England, and Women in Parliament"
"The Poor Man to the Discontented Rich"
Fletcher
"Joseph of Arimathea," The Congregationalist
[P. B. F.?]
"Are You Sure of Salvation?"
Rev. E. N. Kirk, D. D.
"Death and Heaven"
John J. Morris
"Religious Matters: Events and Opinions"
Two copies
"The Movement: Three Interesting Incidents," The Boston Herald
"State Personals: George Graham Lake"
"George Eliot's Husband," The London World
"The Centennial Exhibition: Official Programme for the Opening"
Joseph R. Hawley
"Selections: The Starless Crown"
"The Hawthornes: Romances of a Gifted Family—The Story of Una"
"Samuel Bowles [An Anniversary Poem by Kate Clark of this city, in the Woman's Journal.]" The Woman's Journal
Kate Clark
"The Dead Prince of Orange"
"The death of Princess Alice" [Post?]
"Acting as a Fine Art"
"John Bright's Address: The Most Damaging Blow Yet to Gladstone and Home Rule"
"One of the Defeated Men Who Will be Missed (Mr. Smalley in the Tribune.)"
"Canny Scotch Ants: How They Conducted Themselves in the Presence of a Great Peril"
"In Memoriam: Julia Seymour," Hartford Daily Courant
"The Woman Suffrage Cause: Annual Session of the National Association," Tribune
"Self-Dependence"
Matthew Arnold
"Too Much Conscience" [Independent?]
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
"Mr Hayes's Vindication in the Results," The Republican
"An Excellent Lecture" [The Winstead Herald?]
"Judges and Officers of the Superior Court" [Hartford?]
"Female Suffrage, Etc." [Sunday Capital?]
"Free-Love," Sunday Herald
"The Song of the Shirt"
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
"Historical Poetry of the Ancient Hebrews," The Nation
"The Personality Versus the Omnipresence of Deity: For the Religio-Philosophical Journal," Religio-Philosophical Journal
J.M. Kennedy
"A Study of the Drink Question"
Axel Gustafson
"ISMS: The Female Suffragists---The Woodhull Branch Reviewed" [Sunday Chronicle?]
"Olivia"
"Scotch Liberals Awake: Enthusiasm for Home-Rule: Ovations to Gladstone," Hartford Times
"How Would Hancock Suit? Further Answers to Eagle's Query"
Folder 4Newspaper clippings (1 of 2)
This folder includes a letter to the editor like article from Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Victoria Woodhull.

Folder 5Newspaper clippings (2 of 2)
This folder includes "The American Minister at Dulwich College," which is glued to an advertisement for "Henry Ward Beecher: his life and characteristics."



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